Long-term psychosocial adaptation of children who survive burns involving 80% or greater total body surface area

Patricia Blakeney, Walter Meyer, Rhonda Robert, Manubhai Desai, Steven Wolf, David Herndon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

71 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To examine the psychosocial adjustment of survivors of massive pediatric burn injuries, the change in adjustment across time, and the impact on parents. Background: Patients/parents were assessed at regular intervals postburn using standardized tests of adjustment. Patients who could not be included in standardized longitudinal assessments were administered questionnaires by mail/telephone. Methods: The Child Behavior Checklist, the Teacher Report Form, the Youth Self Report Form, and the Parenting Stress Index were utilized to assess adjustment. Results: On all objective measures, the group of survivors and their parents were within normal limits. Adjustment neither improved nor deteriorated over time. Conclusion: Children who survive massive burn injuries can achieve positive psychosocial adaptation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)625-634
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Trauma - Injury, Infection and Critical Care
Volume44
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1998

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Social Adjustment
Body Surface Area
Burns
Parents
Survivors
Parenting
Wounds and Injuries
Postal Service
Child Behavior
Checklist
Telephone
Self Report
Pediatrics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Long-term psychosocial adaptation of children who survive burns involving 80% or greater total body surface area. / Blakeney, Patricia; Meyer, Walter; Robert, Rhonda; Desai, Manubhai; Wolf, Steven; Herndon, David.

In: Journal of Trauma - Injury, Infection and Critical Care, Vol. 44, No. 4, 04.1998, p. 625-634.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Blakeney, Patricia ; Meyer, Walter ; Robert, Rhonda ; Desai, Manubhai ; Wolf, Steven ; Herndon, David. / Long-term psychosocial adaptation of children who survive burns involving 80% or greater total body surface area. In: Journal of Trauma - Injury, Infection and Critical Care. 1998 ; Vol. 44, No. 4. pp. 625-634.
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