Long-term studies of hantavirus reservoir populations in the southwestern United States

Rationale, potential, and methods

James N. Mills, Terry L. Yates, Thomas Ksiazek, C. J. Peters, James E. Childs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

108 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Hantaviruses are rodent-borne zoonotic agents that cause hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome in Asia and Europe and hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) in North and South America. The epidemiology of human diseases caused by these viruses is tied to the ecology of the rodent hosts, and effective control and prevention relies on a thorough understanding of host ecology. After the 1993 HPS outbreak in the southwestern United States, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention initiated long-term studies of the temporal dynamics of hantavirus infection in host populations. These studies, which used mark-recapture techniques on 24 trapping webs at nine sites in the southwestern United States, were designed to monitor changes in reservoir population densities and in the prevalence and incidence of infection; quantify environmental factors associated with these changes; and when linked to surveillance databases for HPS, lead to predictive models of human risk to be used in the design and implementation of control and prevention measures for human hantavirus disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)95-101
Number of pages7
JournalEmerging Infectious Diseases
Volume5
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1999
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome
Southwestern United States
Hantavirus
Ecology
Rodentia
Hantavirus Infections
Population
Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome
South America
Zoonoses
Virus Diseases
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
North America
Population Density
Disease Outbreaks
Epidemiology
Databases
Incidence
Infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)

Cite this

Long-term studies of hantavirus reservoir populations in the southwestern United States : Rationale, potential, and methods. / Mills, James N.; Yates, Terry L.; Ksiazek, Thomas; Peters, C. J.; Childs, James E.

In: Emerging Infectious Diseases, Vol. 5, No. 1, 1999, p. 95-101.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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