Longitudinal association between teen sexting and sexual behavior

Jeffrey Temple, HyeJeong Choi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

74 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: This study examines the temporal sequencing of sexting and sexual intercourse and the role of active sexting (sending a nude picture) in mediating the relationship between passive sexting (asking or being asked for a nude picture) and sexual behaviors. METHODS: Data are from Wave 2 (spring 2011) and Wave 3 (spring 2012) of an ongoing 6-year longitudinal study of high school students in southeast Texas. Participants included 964 ethnically diverse adolescents with a mean age of 16.09 years (56% female; 31% African American, 29% Caucasian, 28% Hispanic, 12% other). Retention rate for 1-year follow-up was 93%. Participants self-reported history of sexual activity (intercourse, risky sex) and sexting (sent, asked, been asked). Using path analysis, we examined whether teen sexting at baseline predicted sexual behavior at 1-year follow-up and whether active sexting mediated the relationship between passive sexting and sexual behavior. RESULTS: The odds of being sexually active at Wave 3 were 1.32 times larger for youth who sent a sext at Wave 2, relative to counterparts. However, sexting was not temporally associated with risky sexual behaviors. Consistent with our hypothesis, active sexting at Wave 2 mediated the relationship between asking or being asked for a sext and having sex over the next year. CONCLUSIONS: This study extends cross-sectional literature and supports the notion that sexting fits within the context of adolescent sexual development and may be a viable indicator of adolescent sexual activity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e1287-e1292
JournalPediatrics
Volume134
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2014

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Sexual Behavior
Coitus
Adolescent Development
Sexual Development
Hispanic Americans
African Americans
Longitudinal Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Students

Keywords

  • Adolescents
  • Sexual behavior
  • Teen sexting

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Longitudinal association between teen sexting and sexual behavior. / Temple, Jeffrey; Choi, HyeJeong.

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 134, No. 5, 01.11.2014, p. e1287-e1292.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Temple, Jeffrey ; Choi, HyeJeong. / Longitudinal association between teen sexting and sexual behavior. In: Pediatrics. 2014 ; Vol. 134, No. 5. pp. e1287-e1292.
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