Longitudinal trends in fall accidents in community dwelling Korean adults

The 2008-2013 Korean community health survey

Ickpyo Hong, Annie N. Simpson, Sarah Logan, Hee Soon Woo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective To describe the longitudinal characteristics of unintentional fall accidents using a representative population-based sample of Korean adults. Methods We examined data from the Korean Community Health Survey from 2008 to 2013. Univariate analysis and multivariable logistic regression were used to identify the characteristics of fall accidents in adults. Results Between 2008 and 2013, the incidence rate of fall accidents requiring medical treatment increased from 1,248 to 3,423 per 100,000 people (p<0.001), while the proportion of indoor fall accidents decreased from 38.12% to 23.16% (p<0.001). Females had more annual fall accidents than males (p<0.001). The major reason for fall accidents was slippery floors (33.7% in 2011 and 36.3% in 2013). Between 2008 and 2010, variables associated with higher fall accident risk included specific months (August and September), old age, female gender, current drinker, current smoker, diabetes, osteoarthritis, osteoporosis, and depression. A high level of education and living with a partner were negatively associated with fall accident risk. In 2013, people experiencing more than 1 fall accident felt more fear of falling than those having no fall accidents (odds ratio [OR] for 1 fall, 2.12; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.04-2.12; OR for more than 2 falls, 2.97; 95% CI, 2.83-3.10). Conclusion The occurrence of fall accidents has consistently increased in Korea from 2008 to 2013. Future intervention studies are needed to reduce the increasing incidence rates of fall accidents in community dwelling adults.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)657-665
Number of pages9
JournalAnnals of Rehabilitation Medicine
Volume40
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Independent Living
Health Surveys
Accidents
Surveys and Questionnaires
Accidental Falls
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Incidence
Korea
Osteoarthritis
Osteoporosis
Fear

Keywords

  • Accidental falls
  • Adult
  • Fear
  • Korean
  • Life style

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation

Cite this

Longitudinal trends in fall accidents in community dwelling Korean adults : The 2008-2013 Korean community health survey. / Hong, Ickpyo; Simpson, Annie N.; Logan, Sarah; Woo, Hee Soon.

In: Annals of Rehabilitation Medicine, Vol. 40, No. 4, 2016, p. 657-665.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Objective To describe the longitudinal characteristics of unintentional fall accidents using a representative population-based sample of Korean adults. Methods We examined data from the Korean Community Health Survey from 2008 to 2013. Univariate analysis and multivariable logistic regression were used to identify the characteristics of fall accidents in adults. Results Between 2008 and 2013, the incidence rate of fall accidents requiring medical treatment increased from 1,248 to 3,423 per 100,000 people (p<0.001), while the proportion of indoor fall accidents decreased from 38.12{\%} to 23.16{\%} (p<0.001). Females had more annual fall accidents than males (p<0.001). The major reason for fall accidents was slippery floors (33.7{\%} in 2011 and 36.3{\%} in 2013). Between 2008 and 2010, variables associated with higher fall accident risk included specific months (August and September), old age, female gender, current drinker, current smoker, diabetes, osteoarthritis, osteoporosis, and depression. A high level of education and living with a partner were negatively associated with fall accident risk. In 2013, people experiencing more than 1 fall accident felt more fear of falling than those having no fall accidents (odds ratio [OR] for 1 fall, 2.12; 95{\%} confidence interval [CI], 2.04-2.12; OR for more than 2 falls, 2.97; 95{\%} CI, 2.83-3.10). Conclusion The occurrence of fall accidents has consistently increased in Korea from 2008 to 2013. Future intervention studies are needed to reduce the increasing incidence rates of fall accidents in community dwelling adults.",
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