Lower extremity amputations in diabetic Mexican American elders - Incidence, prevalence and correlates

Max E. Otiniano, Xianglin Du, Kenneth Ottenbacher, Sandra A. Black, Kyriakos Markides

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study was designed to determine the incidence and prevalence of amputations in diabetic Mexican American elders and to identify correlates of lower extremity amputations. Data for this study came from baseline and two follow-up interviews of the Hispanic Established Population for the Epidemiological Study of the Elderly (EPESE) conducted in five southwestern states (Texas, California, New Mexico, Colorado and Arizona) in 1993-1994. Of the 3050 subjects aged 65 and older, 690 reported diabetes, and from these, 60 (8%) reported having at least one lower extremity amputation. Losing a leg was the most common type of amputation (53%). Twelve percent of respondents reported a new amputation and 40% of amputees reported a second amputation during follow-up. Mortality among amputees was 46% during a 5-year follow-up. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that being male and having eye problems, hip fracture and diabetes for 10 or more years were significantly associated with lower extremity amputations at baseline, whereas obesity, stroke and 10 or more years with diabetes were significantly associated with new amputations at 5-year follow-up. Gender and disease history were associated with lower extremity amputations at baseline and follow-up. These variables may be useful in developing patient education and intervention programs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)59-65
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Diabetes and its Complications
Volume17
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2003

Fingerprint

Amputation
Lower Extremity
Incidence
Amputees
Hip Fractures
Patient Education
Hispanic Americans
Epidemiologic Studies
Leg
Obesity
Logistic Models
Stroke
Regression Analysis
Interviews
Mortality
Population

Keywords

  • Lower extremity amputations
  • Mexican American elders
  • Type 2 diabetes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Lower extremity amputations in diabetic Mexican American elders - Incidence, prevalence and correlates. / Otiniano, Max E.; Du, Xianglin; Ottenbacher, Kenneth; Black, Sandra A.; Markides, Kyriakos.

In: Journal of Diabetes and its Complications, Vol. 17, No. 2, 03.2003, p. 59-65.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{abc53dffe6c6473cb9a160b45790cb45,
title = "Lower extremity amputations in diabetic Mexican American elders - Incidence, prevalence and correlates",
abstract = "This study was designed to determine the incidence and prevalence of amputations in diabetic Mexican American elders and to identify correlates of lower extremity amputations. Data for this study came from baseline and two follow-up interviews of the Hispanic Established Population for the Epidemiological Study of the Elderly (EPESE) conducted in five southwestern states (Texas, California, New Mexico, Colorado and Arizona) in 1993-1994. Of the 3050 subjects aged 65 and older, 690 reported diabetes, and from these, 60 (8{\%}) reported having at least one lower extremity amputation. Losing a leg was the most common type of amputation (53{\%}). Twelve percent of respondents reported a new amputation and 40{\%} of amputees reported a second amputation during follow-up. Mortality among amputees was 46{\%} during a 5-year follow-up. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that being male and having eye problems, hip fracture and diabetes for 10 or more years were significantly associated with lower extremity amputations at baseline, whereas obesity, stroke and 10 or more years with diabetes were significantly associated with new amputations at 5-year follow-up. Gender and disease history were associated with lower extremity amputations at baseline and follow-up. These variables may be useful in developing patient education and intervention programs.",
keywords = "Lower extremity amputations, Mexican American elders, Type 2 diabetes",
author = "Otiniano, {Max E.} and Xianglin Du and Kenneth Ottenbacher and Black, {Sandra A.} and Kyriakos Markides",
year = "2003",
month = "3",
doi = "10.1016/S1056-8727(02)00175-7",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "17",
pages = "59--65",
journal = "Journal of Diabetes and its Complications",
issn = "1056-8727",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Lower extremity amputations in diabetic Mexican American elders - Incidence, prevalence and correlates

AU - Otiniano, Max E.

AU - Du, Xianglin

AU - Ottenbacher, Kenneth

AU - Black, Sandra A.

AU - Markides, Kyriakos

PY - 2003/3

Y1 - 2003/3

N2 - This study was designed to determine the incidence and prevalence of amputations in diabetic Mexican American elders and to identify correlates of lower extremity amputations. Data for this study came from baseline and two follow-up interviews of the Hispanic Established Population for the Epidemiological Study of the Elderly (EPESE) conducted in five southwestern states (Texas, California, New Mexico, Colorado and Arizona) in 1993-1994. Of the 3050 subjects aged 65 and older, 690 reported diabetes, and from these, 60 (8%) reported having at least one lower extremity amputation. Losing a leg was the most common type of amputation (53%). Twelve percent of respondents reported a new amputation and 40% of amputees reported a second amputation during follow-up. Mortality among amputees was 46% during a 5-year follow-up. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that being male and having eye problems, hip fracture and diabetes for 10 or more years were significantly associated with lower extremity amputations at baseline, whereas obesity, stroke and 10 or more years with diabetes were significantly associated with new amputations at 5-year follow-up. Gender and disease history were associated with lower extremity amputations at baseline and follow-up. These variables may be useful in developing patient education and intervention programs.

AB - This study was designed to determine the incidence and prevalence of amputations in diabetic Mexican American elders and to identify correlates of lower extremity amputations. Data for this study came from baseline and two follow-up interviews of the Hispanic Established Population for the Epidemiological Study of the Elderly (EPESE) conducted in five southwestern states (Texas, California, New Mexico, Colorado and Arizona) in 1993-1994. Of the 3050 subjects aged 65 and older, 690 reported diabetes, and from these, 60 (8%) reported having at least one lower extremity amputation. Losing a leg was the most common type of amputation (53%). Twelve percent of respondents reported a new amputation and 40% of amputees reported a second amputation during follow-up. Mortality among amputees was 46% during a 5-year follow-up. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that being male and having eye problems, hip fracture and diabetes for 10 or more years were significantly associated with lower extremity amputations at baseline, whereas obesity, stroke and 10 or more years with diabetes were significantly associated with new amputations at 5-year follow-up. Gender and disease history were associated with lower extremity amputations at baseline and follow-up. These variables may be useful in developing patient education and intervention programs.

KW - Lower extremity amputations

KW - Mexican American elders

KW - Type 2 diabetes

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0037373598&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0037373598&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S1056-8727(02)00175-7

DO - 10.1016/S1056-8727(02)00175-7

M3 - Article

C2 - 12614970

AN - SCOPUS:0037373598

VL - 17

SP - 59

EP - 65

JO - Journal of Diabetes and its Complications

JF - Journal of Diabetes and its Complications

SN - 1056-8727

IS - 2

ER -