Making the laboratory a partner in patient safety

Anand S. Dighe, Michael Laposata

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The selection and interpretation of laboratory tests provide numerous opportunities for medical error and patient harm. A potential solution is to enlist the laboratory and laboratory-based pathologists to serve as active participants in the process of selecting and interpreting laboratory tests. The transformation of the laboratory pathologist from a test result producer to an active participant in the generation of clinical information has many potential benefits for the system, including improved diagnosis, improved patient safety, and reduced costs. In this article, the authors discuss potential solutions and examine the barriers that must be addressed before the pathologist can adopt these new roles and become a more valuable partner in the clinical community.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalClinical Leadership and Management Review
Volume18
Issue number6
StatePublished - Nov 2004
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Patient Safety
Patient Harm
Medical Errors
Patient safety
Costs and Cost Analysis
Pathologists

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Business, Management and Accounting(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Making the laboratory a partner in patient safety. / Dighe, Anand S.; Laposata, Michael.

In: Clinical Leadership and Management Review, Vol. 18, No. 6, 11.2004.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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