Mechanical feedback between membrane tension and dynamics

Nils C. Gauthier, Thomas A. Masters, Michael Sheetz

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

196 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The plasma membrane represents a physical inelastic barrier with a given area that adheres to the underlying cytoskeleton. The tension in the membrane physically affects cell functions and recent studies have highlighted that this physical signal orchestrates complex aspects of trafficking and motility. Despite its undeniable importance, little is known about the mechanisms by which membrane tension regulates cell functions or stimulates signals. The maintenance of membrane tension is also a matter of debate, particularly the nature of the membrane reservoir and trafficking pathways that buffer tension. In this review we discuss the importance of membrane area and of tension as a master integrator of cell functions, particularly for membrane traffic.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)527-535
Number of pages9
JournalTrends in Cell Biology
Volume22
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Membranes
Architectural Accessibility
Cytoskeleton
Buffers
Maintenance
Cell Membrane

Keywords

  • Cell migration
  • CLIC
  • Endocytosis
  • Exocytosis
  • GEEC
  • Membrane dynamics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Mechanical feedback between membrane tension and dynamics. / Gauthier, Nils C.; Masters, Thomas A.; Sheetz, Michael.

In: Trends in Cell Biology, Vol. 22, No. 10, 01.10.2012, p. 527-535.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Gauthier, Nils C. ; Masters, Thomas A. ; Sheetz, Michael. / Mechanical feedback between membrane tension and dynamics. In: Trends in Cell Biology. 2012 ; Vol. 22, No. 10. pp. 527-535.
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