Medical Students’ Evaluation of Scientific Evidence and Their Justifications for Their Clinical Decisions: a Pilot Study

Christina Cestone, Rachel Lewis, Judith Aronson, Celia Chao

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Medical school curricula teach students to apply scientific evidence for clinical decision-making. Research on whole-task evidence-based decision-making suggests that appraisal of scientific evidence is a challenge for trainees. This pilot study aimed to link medical students’ (MS) appraisal of scientific literature with clinical decision-making to inform future EBM instruction. Fifty-three MS evaluated scientific evidence and provided justifications for their clinical decisions. The MS group (n = 29) receiving more detailed evidence made a correct clinical decision against breast surgery (20; 69%) versus the comparison group (14; 58%; p <.05). MS justified their decisions predominantly on the evidence provided and personal experience.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)587-590
Number of pages4
JournalMedical Science Educator
Volume28
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 15 2018

Fingerprint

Medical Students
medical student
evaluation
evidence
Literature
decision making
Medical Schools
Curriculum
Decision Making
Breast
technical literature
Students
trainee
surgery
Group
Research
instruction
curriculum
school
Clinical Decision-Making

Keywords

  • Clinical decision-making medical curriculum
  • Evidence-based medicine
  • Scientific text comprehension

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Education

Cite this

Medical Students’ Evaluation of Scientific Evidence and Their Justifications for Their Clinical Decisions : a Pilot Study. / Cestone, Christina; Lewis, Rachel; Aronson, Judith; Chao, Celia.

In: Medical Science Educator, Vol. 28, No. 4, 15.12.2018, p. 587-590.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{98f8978929dc4dc8ac7711a98e3ac527,
title = "Medical Students’ Evaluation of Scientific Evidence and Their Justifications for Their Clinical Decisions: a Pilot Study",
abstract = "Medical school curricula teach students to apply scientific evidence for clinical decision-making. Research on whole-task evidence-based decision-making suggests that appraisal of scientific evidence is a challenge for trainees. This pilot study aimed to link medical students’ (MS) appraisal of scientific literature with clinical decision-making to inform future EBM instruction. Fifty-three MS evaluated scientific evidence and provided justifications for their clinical decisions. The MS group (n = 29) receiving more detailed evidence made a correct clinical decision against breast surgery (20; 69{\%}) versus the comparison group (14; 58{\%}; p <.05). MS justified their decisions predominantly on the evidence provided and personal experience.",
keywords = "Clinical decision-making medical curriculum, Evidence-based medicine, Scientific text comprehension",
author = "Christina Cestone and Rachel Lewis and Judith Aronson and Celia Chao",
year = "2018",
month = "12",
day = "15",
doi = "10.1007/s40670-018-0595-5",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "28",
pages = "587--590",
journal = "Medical Science Educator",
issn = "2156-8650",
publisher = "Springer New York",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Medical Students’ Evaluation of Scientific Evidence and Their Justifications for Their Clinical Decisions

T2 - a Pilot Study

AU - Cestone, Christina

AU - Lewis, Rachel

AU - Aronson, Judith

AU - Chao, Celia

PY - 2018/12/15

Y1 - 2018/12/15

N2 - Medical school curricula teach students to apply scientific evidence for clinical decision-making. Research on whole-task evidence-based decision-making suggests that appraisal of scientific evidence is a challenge for trainees. This pilot study aimed to link medical students’ (MS) appraisal of scientific literature with clinical decision-making to inform future EBM instruction. Fifty-three MS evaluated scientific evidence and provided justifications for their clinical decisions. The MS group (n = 29) receiving more detailed evidence made a correct clinical decision against breast surgery (20; 69%) versus the comparison group (14; 58%; p <.05). MS justified their decisions predominantly on the evidence provided and personal experience.

AB - Medical school curricula teach students to apply scientific evidence for clinical decision-making. Research on whole-task evidence-based decision-making suggests that appraisal of scientific evidence is a challenge for trainees. This pilot study aimed to link medical students’ (MS) appraisal of scientific literature with clinical decision-making to inform future EBM instruction. Fifty-three MS evaluated scientific evidence and provided justifications for their clinical decisions. The MS group (n = 29) receiving more detailed evidence made a correct clinical decision against breast surgery (20; 69%) versus the comparison group (14; 58%; p <.05). MS justified their decisions predominantly on the evidence provided and personal experience.

KW - Clinical decision-making medical curriculum

KW - Evidence-based medicine

KW - Scientific text comprehension

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85061935470&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85061935470&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s40670-018-0595-5

DO - 10.1007/s40670-018-0595-5

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85061935470

VL - 28

SP - 587

EP - 590

JO - Medical Science Educator

JF - Medical Science Educator

SN - 2156-8650

IS - 4

ER -