Medicare Reimbursement for Hospice Care

Jerome W. Yates, Elaine R. Davis, Marcia G. Kliban, Peter W. Wright, Howard Brody, Joanne Lynn

Research output: Contribution to journalLetter

Abstract

To the Editor: In an effort to attack the regulations with what appears to be a modest familiarity with the types of patients who dominate admissions to hospices, Drs. Brody and Lynn exaggerate, perhaps for effect, the problems connected with prognostication of survival.1 Unfortunately, the “average” clinical course for many patients with untreatable and advanced cancers is relatively predictable in the last months of life. Even good supportive care does not often alter the relentless course of the disease. Because approximately 90 percent of the patients admitted to hospices fall into this category, some understanding of the natural history.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)333-334
Number of pages2
JournalNew England Journal of Medicine
Volume311
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2 1984

Fingerprint

Hospice Care
Medicare
Hospices
Natural History
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Yates, J. W., Davis, E. R., Kliban, M. G., Wright, P. W., Brody, H., & Lynn, J. (1984). Medicare Reimbursement for Hospice Care. New England Journal of Medicine, 311(5), 333-334. https://doi.org/10.1056/NEJM198408023110520

Medicare Reimbursement for Hospice Care. / Yates, Jerome W.; Davis, Elaine R.; Kliban, Marcia G.; Wright, Peter W.; Brody, Howard; Lynn, Joanne.

In: New England Journal of Medicine, Vol. 311, No. 5, 02.08.1984, p. 333-334.

Research output: Contribution to journalLetter

Yates, JW, Davis, ER, Kliban, MG, Wright, PW, Brody, H & Lynn, J 1984, 'Medicare Reimbursement for Hospice Care', New England Journal of Medicine, vol. 311, no. 5, pp. 333-334. https://doi.org/10.1056/NEJM198408023110520
Yates JW, Davis ER, Kliban MG, Wright PW, Brody H, Lynn J. Medicare Reimbursement for Hospice Care. New England Journal of Medicine. 1984 Aug 2;311(5):333-334. https://doi.org/10.1056/NEJM198408023110520
Yates, Jerome W. ; Davis, Elaine R. ; Kliban, Marcia G. ; Wright, Peter W. ; Brody, Howard ; Lynn, Joanne. / Medicare Reimbursement for Hospice Care. In: New England Journal of Medicine. 1984 ; Vol. 311, No. 5. pp. 333-334.
@article{ebdd6ea856f94a20b78c7546e40e2c26,
title = "Medicare Reimbursement for Hospice Care",
abstract = "To the Editor: In an effort to attack the regulations with what appears to be a modest familiarity with the types of patients who dominate admissions to hospices, Drs. Brody and Lynn exaggerate, perhaps for effect, the problems connected with prognostication of survival.1 Unfortunately, the “average” clinical course for many patients with untreatable and advanced cancers is relatively predictable in the last months of life. Even good supportive care does not often alter the relentless course of the disease. Because approximately 90 percent of the patients admitted to hospices fall into this category, some understanding of the natural history.",
author = "Yates, {Jerome W.} and Davis, {Elaine R.} and Kliban, {Marcia G.} and Wright, {Peter W.} and Howard Brody and Joanne Lynn",
year = "1984",
month = "8",
day = "2",
doi = "10.1056/NEJM198408023110520",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "311",
pages = "333--334",
journal = "New England Journal of Medicine",
issn = "0028-4793",
publisher = "Massachussetts Medical Society",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Medicare Reimbursement for Hospice Care

AU - Yates, Jerome W.

AU - Davis, Elaine R.

AU - Kliban, Marcia G.

AU - Wright, Peter W.

AU - Brody, Howard

AU - Lynn, Joanne

PY - 1984/8/2

Y1 - 1984/8/2

N2 - To the Editor: In an effort to attack the regulations with what appears to be a modest familiarity with the types of patients who dominate admissions to hospices, Drs. Brody and Lynn exaggerate, perhaps for effect, the problems connected with prognostication of survival.1 Unfortunately, the “average” clinical course for many patients with untreatable and advanced cancers is relatively predictable in the last months of life. Even good supportive care does not often alter the relentless course of the disease. Because approximately 90 percent of the patients admitted to hospices fall into this category, some understanding of the natural history.

AB - To the Editor: In an effort to attack the regulations with what appears to be a modest familiarity with the types of patients who dominate admissions to hospices, Drs. Brody and Lynn exaggerate, perhaps for effect, the problems connected with prognostication of survival.1 Unfortunately, the “average” clinical course for many patients with untreatable and advanced cancers is relatively predictable in the last months of life. Even good supportive care does not often alter the relentless course of the disease. Because approximately 90 percent of the patients admitted to hospices fall into this category, some understanding of the natural history.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0021753836&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0021753836&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1056/NEJM198408023110520

DO - 10.1056/NEJM198408023110520

M3 - Letter

VL - 311

SP - 333

EP - 334

JO - New England Journal of Medicine

JF - New England Journal of Medicine

SN - 0028-4793

IS - 5

ER -