Mentoring in Clinical-Translational Research

A Study of Participants in Master's Degree Programs

Aileen P. McGinn, Linda S. Lee, Adriana Baez, Jack Zwanziger, Karl Anderson, Ellen W. Seely, Ellie Schoenbaum

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Research projects in translational science are increasingly complex and require interdisciplinary collaborations. In the context of training translational researchers, this suggests that multiple mentors may be needed in different content areas. This study explored mentoring structure as it relates to perceived mentoring effectiveness and other characteristics of master's-level trainees in clinical-translational research training programs. A cross-sectional online survey of recent graduates of clinical research master's program was conducted. Of 73 surveys distributed, 56.2% (n = 41) complete responses were analyzed. Trainees were overwhelmingly positive about participation in their master's programs and the impact it had on their professional development. Overall the majority (≥75%) of trainees perceived they had effective mentoring in terms of developing skills needed for conducting clinical-translational research. Fewer trainees perceived effective mentoring in career development and work-life balance. In all 15 areas of mentoring effectiveness assessed, higher rates of perceived mentor effectiveness was seen among trainees with ≥2 mentors compared to those with solo mentoring (SM). In addition, trainees with ≥2 mentors perceived having effective mentoring in more mentoring aspects (median: 14.0; IQR: 12.0-15.0) than trainees with SM (median: 10.5; IQR: 8.0-14.5). Results from this survey suggest having ≥2 mentors may be beneficial in fulfilling trainee expectations for mentoring in clinical-translational training.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)746-753
Number of pages8
JournalClinical and Translational Science
Volume8
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2015

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Translational Medical Research
Mentors
Mentoring
Research
Cross-Sectional Studies
Research Personnel
Education

Keywords

  • Clinical research
  • Mentoring
  • Translational research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)

Cite this

Mentoring in Clinical-Translational Research : A Study of Participants in Master's Degree Programs. / McGinn, Aileen P.; Lee, Linda S.; Baez, Adriana; Zwanziger, Jack; Anderson, Karl; Seely, Ellen W.; Schoenbaum, Ellie.

In: Clinical and Translational Science, Vol. 8, No. 6, 01.12.2015, p. 746-753.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

McGinn, Aileen P. ; Lee, Linda S. ; Baez, Adriana ; Zwanziger, Jack ; Anderson, Karl ; Seely, Ellen W. ; Schoenbaum, Ellie. / Mentoring in Clinical-Translational Research : A Study of Participants in Master's Degree Programs. In: Clinical and Translational Science. 2015 ; Vol. 8, No. 6. pp. 746-753.
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