Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection in the Texas prison system.

Jacques Baillargeon, Michael F. Kelley, Charles T. Leach, Gwen Baillargeon, Brad H. Pollock

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

48 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent reports indicate that correctional facility inmates may be at elevated risk for contracting methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection because of overcrowding, poor hygiene, and high rates of diseases causing immunosuppression. The present study of 299,179 Texas inmates who were incarcerated between 1999-2001 indicated an incidence of 12 MRSA infections/1000 person-years. Inmates with circulatory disease, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, end-stage liver disease, end-stage renal disease, human immunodeficiency virus infection or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, and skin diseases all exhibited elevated rates of MRSA infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalClinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America
Volume38
Issue number9
StatePublished - 2004
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Prisons
Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus
Infection
End Stage Liver Disease
Virus Diseases
Hygiene
Skin Diseases
Immunosuppression
Chronic Kidney Failure
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Cardiovascular Diseases
HIV
Incidence

Cite this

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection in the Texas prison system. / Baillargeon, Jacques; Kelley, Michael F.; Leach, Charles T.; Baillargeon, Gwen; Pollock, Brad H.

In: Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, Vol. 38, No. 9, 2004.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{039693f31ce24220b366f0ddff9d0479,
title = "Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection in the Texas prison system.",
abstract = "Recent reports indicate that correctional facility inmates may be at elevated risk for contracting methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection because of overcrowding, poor hygiene, and high rates of diseases causing immunosuppression. The present study of 299,179 Texas inmates who were incarcerated between 1999-2001 indicated an incidence of 12 MRSA infections/1000 person-years. Inmates with circulatory disease, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, end-stage liver disease, end-stage renal disease, human immunodeficiency virus infection or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, and skin diseases all exhibited elevated rates of MRSA infection.",
author = "Jacques Baillargeon and Kelley, {Michael F.} and Leach, {Charles T.} and Gwen Baillargeon and Pollock, {Brad H.}",
year = "2004",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "38",
journal = "Clinical Infectious Diseases",
issn = "1058-4838",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "9",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection in the Texas prison system.

AU - Baillargeon, Jacques

AU - Kelley, Michael F.

AU - Leach, Charles T.

AU - Baillargeon, Gwen

AU - Pollock, Brad H.

PY - 2004

Y1 - 2004

N2 - Recent reports indicate that correctional facility inmates may be at elevated risk for contracting methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection because of overcrowding, poor hygiene, and high rates of diseases causing immunosuppression. The present study of 299,179 Texas inmates who were incarcerated between 1999-2001 indicated an incidence of 12 MRSA infections/1000 person-years. Inmates with circulatory disease, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, end-stage liver disease, end-stage renal disease, human immunodeficiency virus infection or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, and skin diseases all exhibited elevated rates of MRSA infection.

AB - Recent reports indicate that correctional facility inmates may be at elevated risk for contracting methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection because of overcrowding, poor hygiene, and high rates of diseases causing immunosuppression. The present study of 299,179 Texas inmates who were incarcerated between 1999-2001 indicated an incidence of 12 MRSA infections/1000 person-years. Inmates with circulatory disease, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, end-stage liver disease, end-stage renal disease, human immunodeficiency virus infection or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, and skin diseases all exhibited elevated rates of MRSA infection.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=2342540386&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=2342540386&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 15127360

AN - SCOPUS:2342540386

VL - 38

JO - Clinical Infectious Diseases

JF - Clinical Infectious Diseases

SN - 1058-4838

IS - 9

ER -