Mexican-American folk medicine

implications for the family physician.

A. P. Chesney, Barbara Thompson, A. Guevara, A. Vela, M. F. Schottstaedt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Literature of Mexican-American folk medicine and on Mexican-American utilization of conventional medical services suggests that folk medicine and utilization of conventional medical services are related. This study reports on interviews with 40 Mexican-American families randomly selected from the community. The results indicate that choice of conventional medical care and/or folk medicine is dependent upon the symptom, that families often use both folk and conventional medicine, that they are more likely to seek medical help for anxiety than for depression, and that knowledge of folk medicine is best acquired by asking about specific folk diseases. These findings have application in family practice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)567-574
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Family Practice
Volume11
Issue number4
StatePublished - Oct 1980
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Family Physicians
Traditional Medicine
Family Practice
Anxiety
Interviews
Depression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Chesney, A. P., Thompson, B., Guevara, A., Vela, A., & Schottstaedt, M. F. (1980). Mexican-American folk medicine: implications for the family physician. Journal of Family Practice, 11(4), 567-574.

Mexican-American folk medicine : implications for the family physician. / Chesney, A. P.; Thompson, Barbara; Guevara, A.; Vela, A.; Schottstaedt, M. F.

In: Journal of Family Practice, Vol. 11, No. 4, 10.1980, p. 567-574.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chesney, AP, Thompson, B, Guevara, A, Vela, A & Schottstaedt, MF 1980, 'Mexican-American folk medicine: implications for the family physician.', Journal of Family Practice, vol. 11, no. 4, pp. 567-574.
Chesney AP, Thompson B, Guevara A, Vela A, Schottstaedt MF. Mexican-American folk medicine: implications for the family physician. Journal of Family Practice. 1980 Oct;11(4):567-574.
Chesney, A. P. ; Thompson, Barbara ; Guevara, A. ; Vela, A. ; Schottstaedt, M. F. / Mexican-American folk medicine : implications for the family physician. In: Journal of Family Practice. 1980 ; Vol. 11, No. 4. pp. 567-574.
@article{87bd267cd00c4a878b9a1ddcbb4eee26,
title = "Mexican-American folk medicine: implications for the family physician.",
abstract = "Literature of Mexican-American folk medicine and on Mexican-American utilization of conventional medical services suggests that folk medicine and utilization of conventional medical services are related. This study reports on interviews with 40 Mexican-American families randomly selected from the community. The results indicate that choice of conventional medical care and/or folk medicine is dependent upon the symptom, that families often use both folk and conventional medicine, that they are more likely to seek medical help for anxiety than for depression, and that knowledge of folk medicine is best acquired by asking about specific folk diseases. These findings have application in family practice.",
author = "Chesney, {A. P.} and Barbara Thompson and A. Guevara and A. Vela and Schottstaedt, {M. F.}",
year = "1980",
month = "10",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "11",
pages = "567--574",
journal = "Journal of Family Practice",
issn = "0094-3509",
publisher = "Appleton-Century-Crofts",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Mexican-American folk medicine

T2 - implications for the family physician.

AU - Chesney, A. P.

AU - Thompson, Barbara

AU - Guevara, A.

AU - Vela, A.

AU - Schottstaedt, M. F.

PY - 1980/10

Y1 - 1980/10

N2 - Literature of Mexican-American folk medicine and on Mexican-American utilization of conventional medical services suggests that folk medicine and utilization of conventional medical services are related. This study reports on interviews with 40 Mexican-American families randomly selected from the community. The results indicate that choice of conventional medical care and/or folk medicine is dependent upon the symptom, that families often use both folk and conventional medicine, that they are more likely to seek medical help for anxiety than for depression, and that knowledge of folk medicine is best acquired by asking about specific folk diseases. These findings have application in family practice.

AB - Literature of Mexican-American folk medicine and on Mexican-American utilization of conventional medical services suggests that folk medicine and utilization of conventional medical services are related. This study reports on interviews with 40 Mexican-American families randomly selected from the community. The results indicate that choice of conventional medical care and/or folk medicine is dependent upon the symptom, that families often use both folk and conventional medicine, that they are more likely to seek medical help for anxiety than for depression, and that knowledge of folk medicine is best acquired by asking about specific folk diseases. These findings have application in family practice.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0019068831&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0019068831&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 11

SP - 567

EP - 574

JO - Journal of Family Practice

JF - Journal of Family Practice

SN - 0094-3509

IS - 4

ER -