Microbiota innate stimulation is a prerequisite for T cell spontaneous proliferation and induction of experimental colitis

Ting Feng, Lanfang Wang, Trenton R. Schoeb, Charles O. Elson, Yingzi Cong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

141 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Little is known about how the microbiota regulates T cell proliferation and whether spontaneous T cell proliferation is involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease. In this study, we show that stimulation of innate pathways by microbiota-derived ligands and antigen-specific T cell stimulation are both required for intestinal inflammation. Microbiota-derived ligands promoted spontaneous T cell proliferation by activating dendritic cells (DCs) to produce IL-6 via Myd88, as shown by the spontaneous proliferation of T cells adoptively transferred into specific pathogen-free (SPF) RAG-/- mice, but not in germfree RAG-/- mice. Reconstitution of germfree RAG-/- mice with cecal bacterial lysate-pulsed DCs, but not with IL-6-/- or Myd88-/- DCs, restored spontaneous T cell proliferation. CBir1 TCR transgenic (CBir1 Tg) T cells, which are specific for an immunodominant microbiota antigen, induced colitis in SPF RAG-/- mice. Blocking the spontaneous proliferation of CBir1 Tg T cells by co-transferring bulk OT II CD4+ T cells abrogated colitis development. Although transferred OT II T cells underwent spontaneous proliferation in RAG-/- mice, the recipients failed to develop colitis because of the lack of cognate antigen in the intestinal lumen. Collectively, our data demonstrate that induction of colitis requires both spontaneous proliferation of T cells driven by microbiota-derived innate signals and antigen-specific T cell proliferation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1321-1332
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Experimental Medicine
Volume207
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 7 2010
Externally publishedYes

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Microbiota
Colitis
Cell Proliferation
T-Lymphocytes
Dendritic Cells
Specific Pathogen-Free Organisms
Antigens
Interleukin-6
Ligands
Immunodominant Epitopes
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases
Inflammation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Immunology and Allergy

Cite this

Microbiota innate stimulation is a prerequisite for T cell spontaneous proliferation and induction of experimental colitis. / Feng, Ting; Wang, Lanfang; Schoeb, Trenton R.; Elson, Charles O.; Cong, Yingzi.

In: Journal of Experimental Medicine, Vol. 207, No. 6, 07.06.2010, p. 1321-1332.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Feng, Ting ; Wang, Lanfang ; Schoeb, Trenton R. ; Elson, Charles O. ; Cong, Yingzi. / Microbiota innate stimulation is a prerequisite for T cell spontaneous proliferation and induction of experimental colitis. In: Journal of Experimental Medicine. 2010 ; Vol. 207, No. 6. pp. 1321-1332.
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