Microbiota metabolite short chain fatty acids, GPCR, and inflammatory bowel diseases

Mingming Sun, Wei Wu, Zhanju Liu, Yingzi Cong

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    82 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Gut microbiota has been well recognized in regulation of intestinal homeostasis and pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases. However, the mechanisms involved are still not completely understood. Further, the components of the microbiota which are critically responsible for such effects are also largely unknown. Accumulating evidence suggests that, in addition to pathogen-associated molecular patterns, nutrition and bacterial metabolites might greatly impact the immune response in the gut and beyond. Short chain fatty acids (SCFA), which are metabolized by gut bacteria from otherwise indigestible fiber-rich diets, have been shown to ameliorate diseases in animal models of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) and allergic asthma. Although the exact mechanisms for the action of SCFA are still not completely clear, most notable among the SCFA targets is the mammalian G protein-coupled receptor pair of GPR41 and GPR43. In addition to the well-documented inhibition of histone deacetylases activity mainly by butyrate and propionate, which causes anti-inflammatory activities on IEC, macrophages, and dendritic cells, SCFA has recently been implicated in promoting development of Treg cells and possibly other T cells. In addition to animal models, the beneficial effects have also been reported from the clinical studies that used SCFA therapeutically in controlled trial settings in inflammatory disease, in that application of SCFA improved indices of IBD and therapeutic efficacy was demonstrated in acute radiation proctitis. In this review article, we will summarize recent progresses of SCFA in regulation of intestinal homeostasis as well as in pathogenesis of IBD.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)1-8
    Number of pages8
    JournalJournal of Gastroenterology
    DOIs
    StateAccepted/In press - Jul 23 2016

    Fingerprint

    Volatile Fatty Acids
    Microbiota
    Inflammatory Bowel Diseases
    Homeostasis
    Proctitis
    Animal Disease Models
    Histone Deacetylases
    Butyrates
    Propionates
    Regulatory T-Lymphocytes
    G-Protein-Coupled Receptors
    Dendritic Cells
    Anti-Inflammatory Agents
    Asthma
    Animal Models
    Macrophages
    Radiation
    Diet
    Bacteria
    T-Lymphocytes

    Keywords

    • GPCR
    • IBD
    • Microbiota
    • Short chain fatty acids

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Gastroenterology

    Cite this

    Microbiota metabolite short chain fatty acids, GPCR, and inflammatory bowel diseases. / Sun, Mingming; Wu, Wei; Liu, Zhanju; Cong, Yingzi.

    In: Journal of Gastroenterology, 23.07.2016, p. 1-8.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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