Mild hypohydration decreases cycling performance in the heat

Costas N. Bardis, Stavros A. Kavouras, Lena Kosti, Marietta Markousi, Labros S. Sidossis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Hypohydration exceeding 2% of body mass decreases exercise performance. However, the effects of mild hypohydration (<2%) are not clear. PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to determine the effects of mild hypohydration on cycling performance during a simulated-hill circuit course in a warm environment (32.5 C ± 0.5 C). METHODS: Ten trained male cyclists (age, 30 ± 7 yr; mass, 78.4 ± 9.5 kg; height, 1.80 ± 0.01 m; V̇O2max, 52.4 ± 3.3 mL·min·kg; and Powermax, 355 ± 29 W) performed a cycling circuit three times on a laboratory ergometer consisting of 5 km at 50% of maximum power output and 5 km at an all-out pace, followed by a 5-min rest every 5 km. Subjects started the performance test either euhydrated (EUH) or hypohydrated (HYP), by 0% ± 0% and -1.0% ± 0.1% of body mass, respectively. RESULTS: Mean speed at the first, second, and third 5-km simulated-hill cycling was higher in the EUH (28.1 ± 3.1, 27.7 ± 3, and 27.0 ± 3.6 km·h) than that in the HYP trial (27.0 ± 2.9, 26.1 ± 3.7, and 25.9 ± 3.6 km·h) (P < 0.05). Mean power output at the first, second, and third 5-km simulated-hill cycling was greater in the EUH (284 ± 55, 266 ± 53, and 254 ± 58 W) than that in the HYP trial (272 ± 56, 250 ± 61, and 240 ± 57 W) (P < 0.05). Gastrointestinal temperature at the end of the first, second, and third 5-km simulated-hill cycling was greater in the HYP (38.3 C ± 0.4 C, 38.4 C ± 0.2 C, and 38.6 C ± 0.2 C) than that in the EUH trial (38.1 C ± 0.3 C, 38.1 C ± 0.3, and 38.3 C ± 0.3 C) (P < 0.05). Overall, sweat sensitivity during the circuit course was greater in the EUH (115 ± 58 g· C·min) versus HYP trial (67 ± 19 g· C·min) (P < 0.05). Furthermore, RPE and heart rate were similar and near maximal between trials (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: The data showed that mild hypohydration decreased cycling performance, possible by inducing greater thermal and cardiovascular strain.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1782-1789
Number of pages8
JournalMedicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
Volume45
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2013

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Keywords

  • Dehydration
  • Fluid Balance
  • Gastrointestinal Temperature
  • Sweating
  • Thermoregulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Bardis, C. N., Kavouras, S. A., Kosti, L., Markousi, M., & Sidossis, L. S. (2013). Mild hypohydration decreases cycling performance in the heat. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 45(9), 1782-1789. https://doi.org/10.1249/MSS.0b013e31828e1e77

Mild hypohydration decreases cycling performance in the heat. / Bardis, Costas N.; Kavouras, Stavros A.; Kosti, Lena; Markousi, Marietta; Sidossis, Labros S.

In: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, Vol. 45, No. 9, 09.2013, p. 1782-1789.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bardis, CN, Kavouras, SA, Kosti, L, Markousi, M & Sidossis, LS 2013, 'Mild hypohydration decreases cycling performance in the heat', Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, vol. 45, no. 9, pp. 1782-1789. https://doi.org/10.1249/MSS.0b013e31828e1e77
Bardis, Costas N. ; Kavouras, Stavros A. ; Kosti, Lena ; Markousi, Marietta ; Sidossis, Labros S. / Mild hypohydration decreases cycling performance in the heat. In: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. 2013 ; Vol. 45, No. 9. pp. 1782-1789.
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abstract = "INTRODUCTION: Hypohydration exceeding 2{\%} of body mass decreases exercise performance. However, the effects of mild hypohydration (<2{\%}) are not clear. PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to determine the effects of mild hypohydration on cycling performance during a simulated-hill circuit course in a warm environment (32.5 C ± 0.5 C). METHODS: Ten trained male cyclists (age, 30 ± 7 yr; mass, 78.4 ± 9.5 kg; height, 1.80 ± 0.01 m; V̇O2max, 52.4 ± 3.3 mL·min·kg; and Powermax, 355 ± 29 W) performed a cycling circuit three times on a laboratory ergometer consisting of 5 km at 50{\%} of maximum power output and 5 km at an all-out pace, followed by a 5-min rest every 5 km. Subjects started the performance test either euhydrated (EUH) or hypohydrated (HYP), by 0{\%} ± 0{\%} and -1.0{\%} ± 0.1{\%} of body mass, respectively. RESULTS: Mean speed at the first, second, and third 5-km simulated-hill cycling was higher in the EUH (28.1 ± 3.1, 27.7 ± 3, and 27.0 ± 3.6 km·h) than that in the HYP trial (27.0 ± 2.9, 26.1 ± 3.7, and 25.9 ± 3.6 km·h) (P < 0.05). Mean power output at the first, second, and third 5-km simulated-hill cycling was greater in the EUH (284 ± 55, 266 ± 53, and 254 ± 58 W) than that in the HYP trial (272 ± 56, 250 ± 61, and 240 ± 57 W) (P < 0.05). Gastrointestinal temperature at the end of the first, second, and third 5-km simulated-hill cycling was greater in the HYP (38.3 C ± 0.4 C, 38.4 C ± 0.2 C, and 38.6 C ± 0.2 C) than that in the EUH trial (38.1 C ± 0.3 C, 38.1 C ± 0.3, and 38.3 C ± 0.3 C) (P < 0.05). Overall, sweat sensitivity during the circuit course was greater in the EUH (115 ± 58 g· C·min) versus HYP trial (67 ± 19 g· C·min) (P < 0.05). Furthermore, RPE and heart rate were similar and near maximal between trials (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: The data showed that mild hypohydration decreased cycling performance, possible by inducing greater thermal and cardiovascular strain.",
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AU - Kavouras, Stavros A.

AU - Kosti, Lena

AU - Markousi, Marietta

AU - Sidossis, Labros S.

PY - 2013/9

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N2 - INTRODUCTION: Hypohydration exceeding 2% of body mass decreases exercise performance. However, the effects of mild hypohydration (<2%) are not clear. PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to determine the effects of mild hypohydration on cycling performance during a simulated-hill circuit course in a warm environment (32.5 C ± 0.5 C). METHODS: Ten trained male cyclists (age, 30 ± 7 yr; mass, 78.4 ± 9.5 kg; height, 1.80 ± 0.01 m; V̇O2max, 52.4 ± 3.3 mL·min·kg; and Powermax, 355 ± 29 W) performed a cycling circuit three times on a laboratory ergometer consisting of 5 km at 50% of maximum power output and 5 km at an all-out pace, followed by a 5-min rest every 5 km. Subjects started the performance test either euhydrated (EUH) or hypohydrated (HYP), by 0% ± 0% and -1.0% ± 0.1% of body mass, respectively. RESULTS: Mean speed at the first, second, and third 5-km simulated-hill cycling was higher in the EUH (28.1 ± 3.1, 27.7 ± 3, and 27.0 ± 3.6 km·h) than that in the HYP trial (27.0 ± 2.9, 26.1 ± 3.7, and 25.9 ± 3.6 km·h) (P < 0.05). Mean power output at the first, second, and third 5-km simulated-hill cycling was greater in the EUH (284 ± 55, 266 ± 53, and 254 ± 58 W) than that in the HYP trial (272 ± 56, 250 ± 61, and 240 ± 57 W) (P < 0.05). Gastrointestinal temperature at the end of the first, second, and third 5-km simulated-hill cycling was greater in the HYP (38.3 C ± 0.4 C, 38.4 C ± 0.2 C, and 38.6 C ± 0.2 C) than that in the EUH trial (38.1 C ± 0.3 C, 38.1 C ± 0.3, and 38.3 C ± 0.3 C) (P < 0.05). Overall, sweat sensitivity during the circuit course was greater in the EUH (115 ± 58 g· C·min) versus HYP trial (67 ± 19 g· C·min) (P < 0.05). Furthermore, RPE and heart rate were similar and near maximal between trials (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: The data showed that mild hypohydration decreased cycling performance, possible by inducing greater thermal and cardiovascular strain.

AB - INTRODUCTION: Hypohydration exceeding 2% of body mass decreases exercise performance. However, the effects of mild hypohydration (<2%) are not clear. PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to determine the effects of mild hypohydration on cycling performance during a simulated-hill circuit course in a warm environment (32.5 C ± 0.5 C). METHODS: Ten trained male cyclists (age, 30 ± 7 yr; mass, 78.4 ± 9.5 kg; height, 1.80 ± 0.01 m; V̇O2max, 52.4 ± 3.3 mL·min·kg; and Powermax, 355 ± 29 W) performed a cycling circuit three times on a laboratory ergometer consisting of 5 km at 50% of maximum power output and 5 km at an all-out pace, followed by a 5-min rest every 5 km. Subjects started the performance test either euhydrated (EUH) or hypohydrated (HYP), by 0% ± 0% and -1.0% ± 0.1% of body mass, respectively. RESULTS: Mean speed at the first, second, and third 5-km simulated-hill cycling was higher in the EUH (28.1 ± 3.1, 27.7 ± 3, and 27.0 ± 3.6 km·h) than that in the HYP trial (27.0 ± 2.9, 26.1 ± 3.7, and 25.9 ± 3.6 km·h) (P < 0.05). Mean power output at the first, second, and third 5-km simulated-hill cycling was greater in the EUH (284 ± 55, 266 ± 53, and 254 ± 58 W) than that in the HYP trial (272 ± 56, 250 ± 61, and 240 ± 57 W) (P < 0.05). Gastrointestinal temperature at the end of the first, second, and third 5-km simulated-hill cycling was greater in the HYP (38.3 C ± 0.4 C, 38.4 C ± 0.2 C, and 38.6 C ± 0.2 C) than that in the EUH trial (38.1 C ± 0.3 C, 38.1 C ± 0.3, and 38.3 C ± 0.3 C) (P < 0.05). Overall, sweat sensitivity during the circuit course was greater in the EUH (115 ± 58 g· C·min) versus HYP trial (67 ± 19 g· C·min) (P < 0.05). Furthermore, RPE and heart rate were similar and near maximal between trials (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: The data showed that mild hypohydration decreased cycling performance, possible by inducing greater thermal and cardiovascular strain.

KW - Dehydration

KW - Fluid Balance

KW - Gastrointestinal Temperature

KW - Sweating

KW - Thermoregulation

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