Minimal enteral nutrient requirements for intestinal growth in neonatal piglets: How much is enough?

Douglas G. Burrin, Barbara Stoll, Ruhong Jiang, Xiaoyan Chang, Bolette Hartmann, Jens Juul Holst, George H. Greeley, Peter J. Reeds

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    169 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Background: Parenterally nourished preterm infants commonly receive minimal enteral feedings, the aim being to enhance intestinal function. Whether this regimen increases intestinal growth has not been established. Objective: Our objective was to determine the minimal enteral nutrient intakes necessary to stimulate and to normalize neonatal intestinal growth. Methods: Intestinal growth and cell proliferation were quantified in neonatal pigs given equal amounts of an elemental nutrient solution for 7 d. Different groups (n = 5-7 per group) received 0%, 10%, 20%, 40%, 60%, 80%, or 100% of total nutrient intake enterally, with the remainder given parenterally. Results: In the jejunum, wet weight, protein mass, and villus height were significantly greater at enteral intakes >40%. Stimulation of ileal protein mass required a higher enteral intake (60%). In both segments, abrupt increases in DNA mass, crypt depth, ornithine decarboxylase activity, and crypt cells in S-phase occurred between enteral intakes of 40% and 60%. Circulating concentrations of glucagon-like peptide-2 and peptide YY, but not gastrin, increased significantly between enteral intakes of 40% and 60% and closely paralleled indexes of cell proliferation Conclusions: The minimal enteral nutrient intake necessary to increase mucosal mass was 40% of total nutrient intake, whereas 60% enteral nutrition was necessary to sustain normal mucosal proliferation and growth. Our results imply that providing <40% of the total nutrient intake enterally does not have significant intestinal trophic effects.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)1603-1610
    Number of pages8
    JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
    Volume71
    Issue number6
    StatePublished - Jun 2000

    Fingerprint

    nutrient requirements
    nutrient intake
    Small Intestine
    piglets
    Food
    Growth
    enteral feeding
    Enteral Nutrition
    cell proliferation
    peptide YY
    Glucagon-Like Peptide 2
    gastrins
    ornithine decarboxylase
    Cell Proliferation
    Peptide YY
    villi
    jejunum
    Ornithine Decarboxylase
    interphase
    Gastrins

    Keywords

    • Cell proliferation
    • Enteral nutrition
    • GLP-2
    • Glucagon-like peptide-2
    • Low-birth-weight infants
    • Minimal enteral feeding
    • Neonatal nutrition
    • Neonatology
    • Peptide YY
    • Premature infants
    • Preterm infants
    • PYY
    • Total parenteral nutrition

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Medicine (miscellaneous)
    • Food Science

    Cite this

    Burrin, D. G., Stoll, B., Jiang, R., Chang, X., Hartmann, B., Holst, J. J., ... Reeds, P. J. (2000). Minimal enteral nutrient requirements for intestinal growth in neonatal piglets: How much is enough? American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 71(6), 1603-1610.

    Minimal enteral nutrient requirements for intestinal growth in neonatal piglets : How much is enough? / Burrin, Douglas G.; Stoll, Barbara; Jiang, Ruhong; Chang, Xiaoyan; Hartmann, Bolette; Holst, Jens Juul; Greeley, George H.; Reeds, Peter J.

    In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 71, No. 6, 06.2000, p. 1603-1610.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Burrin, DG, Stoll, B, Jiang, R, Chang, X, Hartmann, B, Holst, JJ, Greeley, GH & Reeds, PJ 2000, 'Minimal enteral nutrient requirements for intestinal growth in neonatal piglets: How much is enough?', American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 71, no. 6, pp. 1603-1610.
    Burrin DG, Stoll B, Jiang R, Chang X, Hartmann B, Holst JJ et al. Minimal enteral nutrient requirements for intestinal growth in neonatal piglets: How much is enough? American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2000 Jun;71(6):1603-1610.
    Burrin, Douglas G. ; Stoll, Barbara ; Jiang, Ruhong ; Chang, Xiaoyan ; Hartmann, Bolette ; Holst, Jens Juul ; Greeley, George H. ; Reeds, Peter J. / Minimal enteral nutrient requirements for intestinal growth in neonatal piglets : How much is enough?. In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2000 ; Vol. 71, No. 6. pp. 1603-1610.
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    abstract = "Background: Parenterally nourished preterm infants commonly receive minimal enteral feedings, the aim being to enhance intestinal function. Whether this regimen increases intestinal growth has not been established. Objective: Our objective was to determine the minimal enteral nutrient intakes necessary to stimulate and to normalize neonatal intestinal growth. Methods: Intestinal growth and cell proliferation were quantified in neonatal pigs given equal amounts of an elemental nutrient solution for 7 d. Different groups (n = 5-7 per group) received 0{\%}, 10{\%}, 20{\%}, 40{\%}, 60{\%}, 80{\%}, or 100{\%} of total nutrient intake enterally, with the remainder given parenterally. Results: In the jejunum, wet weight, protein mass, and villus height were significantly greater at enteral intakes >40{\%}. Stimulation of ileal protein mass required a higher enteral intake (60{\%}). In both segments, abrupt increases in DNA mass, crypt depth, ornithine decarboxylase activity, and crypt cells in S-phase occurred between enteral intakes of 40{\%} and 60{\%}. Circulating concentrations of glucagon-like peptide-2 and peptide YY, but not gastrin, increased significantly between enteral intakes of 40{\%} and 60{\%} and closely paralleled indexes of cell proliferation Conclusions: The minimal enteral nutrient intake necessary to increase mucosal mass was 40{\%} of total nutrient intake, whereas 60{\%} enteral nutrition was necessary to sustain normal mucosal proliferation and growth. Our results imply that providing <40{\%} of the total nutrient intake enterally does not have significant intestinal trophic effects.",
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    AU - Chang, Xiaoyan

    AU - Hartmann, Bolette

    AU - Holst, Jens Juul

    AU - Greeley, George H.

    AU - Reeds, Peter J.

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