Minimally invasive, nonendoscopic thyroidectomy: A cosmetic alternative to robotic-assisted thyroidectomy

Cara M. Govednik, Samuel K. Snyder, Courtney E. Quinn, Saurabh Saxena, Daniel Jupiter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background The desire to improve cosmesis has driven the introduction of robotic-assisted and video-assisted thyroidectomy techniques. We report on minimally invasive thyroidectomy (MIT) through a 2-cm incision without the added need for video assistance and hypothesize similar clinical results to standard open thyroidectomy. Methods Between May 2012 and December 2013, 62 nonendoscopic MIT were evaluated for demographics, clinical outcomes, and patient satisfaction on a 1-10 scale. The results were compared with a case-matched control group who underwent conventional open thyroidectomy by the same surgeon. Results The 124 study patients demonstrated no differences between groups for demographics or clinical outcomes except a smaller thyroid lobe in the MIT group (9.2 vs 11.7 g; P = .05). There were longer operative times in the MIT group (135.4 vs 119.6 minutes; P = .07) that were not equivalent by equivalence testing (P = .534). In MIT patients, transient recurrent laryngeal nerve injury occurred per nerves at risk (1.1% vs 3.4%; P = .62) with no permanent injuries in either group. There was no difference in symptomatic hypocalcemia (9.7% vs 11.3%; P = .77) and postoperative hematoma (0% vs 3.2%; P = .50). On follow-up, the measured MIT scar was significantly shorter (2.22 vs 3.98 cm; P < .00001), which resulted in significantly improved cosmetic satisfaction ratings (9.56 vs 8.66; P = .03). Conclusion In selected patients, MIT through a 2-cm incision without endoscopic assistance is a safe alternative to standard open thyroidectomy in the hands of an experienced endocrine surgeon. The operating time is slightly increased, but clinical results are equivalent and patient satisfaction is significantly improved.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number3848
Pages (from-to)1030-1038
Number of pages9
JournalSurgery (United States)
Volume156
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

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Thyroidectomy
Robotics
Cosmetics
Patient Satisfaction
Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve Injuries
Demography
Hypocalcemia
Operative Time
Hematoma
Cicatrix
Thyroid Gland
Research Design
Control Groups

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Minimally invasive, nonendoscopic thyroidectomy : A cosmetic alternative to robotic-assisted thyroidectomy. / Govednik, Cara M.; Snyder, Samuel K.; Quinn, Courtney E.; Saxena, Saurabh; Jupiter, Daniel.

In: Surgery (United States), Vol. 156, No. 4, 3848, 01.10.2014, p. 1030-1038.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Govednik, Cara M. ; Snyder, Samuel K. ; Quinn, Courtney E. ; Saxena, Saurabh ; Jupiter, Daniel. / Minimally invasive, nonendoscopic thyroidectomy : A cosmetic alternative to robotic-assisted thyroidectomy. In: Surgery (United States). 2014 ; Vol. 156, No. 4. pp. 1030-1038.
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abstract = "Background The desire to improve cosmesis has driven the introduction of robotic-assisted and video-assisted thyroidectomy techniques. We report on minimally invasive thyroidectomy (MIT) through a 2-cm incision without the added need for video assistance and hypothesize similar clinical results to standard open thyroidectomy. Methods Between May 2012 and December 2013, 62 nonendoscopic MIT were evaluated for demographics, clinical outcomes, and patient satisfaction on a 1-10 scale. The results were compared with a case-matched control group who underwent conventional open thyroidectomy by the same surgeon. Results The 124 study patients demonstrated no differences between groups for demographics or clinical outcomes except a smaller thyroid lobe in the MIT group (9.2 vs 11.7 g; P = .05). There were longer operative times in the MIT group (135.4 vs 119.6 minutes; P = .07) that were not equivalent by equivalence testing (P = .534). In MIT patients, transient recurrent laryngeal nerve injury occurred per nerves at risk (1.1{\%} vs 3.4{\%}; P = .62) with no permanent injuries in either group. There was no difference in symptomatic hypocalcemia (9.7{\%} vs 11.3{\%}; P = .77) and postoperative hematoma (0{\%} vs 3.2{\%}; P = .50). On follow-up, the measured MIT scar was significantly shorter (2.22 vs 3.98 cm; P < .00001), which resulted in significantly improved cosmetic satisfaction ratings (9.56 vs 8.66; P = .03). Conclusion In selected patients, MIT through a 2-cm incision without endoscopic assistance is a safe alternative to standard open thyroidectomy in the hands of an experienced endocrine surgeon. The operating time is slightly increased, but clinical results are equivalent and patient satisfaction is significantly improved.",
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N2 - Background The desire to improve cosmesis has driven the introduction of robotic-assisted and video-assisted thyroidectomy techniques. We report on minimally invasive thyroidectomy (MIT) through a 2-cm incision without the added need for video assistance and hypothesize similar clinical results to standard open thyroidectomy. Methods Between May 2012 and December 2013, 62 nonendoscopic MIT were evaluated for demographics, clinical outcomes, and patient satisfaction on a 1-10 scale. The results were compared with a case-matched control group who underwent conventional open thyroidectomy by the same surgeon. Results The 124 study patients demonstrated no differences between groups for demographics or clinical outcomes except a smaller thyroid lobe in the MIT group (9.2 vs 11.7 g; P = .05). There were longer operative times in the MIT group (135.4 vs 119.6 minutes; P = .07) that were not equivalent by equivalence testing (P = .534). In MIT patients, transient recurrent laryngeal nerve injury occurred per nerves at risk (1.1% vs 3.4%; P = .62) with no permanent injuries in either group. There was no difference in symptomatic hypocalcemia (9.7% vs 11.3%; P = .77) and postoperative hematoma (0% vs 3.2%; P = .50). On follow-up, the measured MIT scar was significantly shorter (2.22 vs 3.98 cm; P < .00001), which resulted in significantly improved cosmetic satisfaction ratings (9.56 vs 8.66; P = .03). Conclusion In selected patients, MIT through a 2-cm incision without endoscopic assistance is a safe alternative to standard open thyroidectomy in the hands of an experienced endocrine surgeon. The operating time is slightly increased, but clinical results are equivalent and patient satisfaction is significantly improved.

AB - Background The desire to improve cosmesis has driven the introduction of robotic-assisted and video-assisted thyroidectomy techniques. We report on minimally invasive thyroidectomy (MIT) through a 2-cm incision without the added need for video assistance and hypothesize similar clinical results to standard open thyroidectomy. Methods Between May 2012 and December 2013, 62 nonendoscopic MIT were evaluated for demographics, clinical outcomes, and patient satisfaction on a 1-10 scale. The results were compared with a case-matched control group who underwent conventional open thyroidectomy by the same surgeon. Results The 124 study patients demonstrated no differences between groups for demographics or clinical outcomes except a smaller thyroid lobe in the MIT group (9.2 vs 11.7 g; P = .05). There were longer operative times in the MIT group (135.4 vs 119.6 minutes; P = .07) that were not equivalent by equivalence testing (P = .534). In MIT patients, transient recurrent laryngeal nerve injury occurred per nerves at risk (1.1% vs 3.4%; P = .62) with no permanent injuries in either group. There was no difference in symptomatic hypocalcemia (9.7% vs 11.3%; P = .77) and postoperative hematoma (0% vs 3.2%; P = .50). On follow-up, the measured MIT scar was significantly shorter (2.22 vs 3.98 cm; P < .00001), which resulted in significantly improved cosmetic satisfaction ratings (9.56 vs 8.66; P = .03). Conclusion In selected patients, MIT through a 2-cm incision without endoscopic assistance is a safe alternative to standard open thyroidectomy in the hands of an experienced endocrine surgeon. The operating time is slightly increased, but clinical results are equivalent and patient satisfaction is significantly improved.

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