Misinformation and Impact on Interprofessional Healthcare Students’ Knowledge, Attitudes, Perceptions, and Concerns of COVID-19

Patricia Richard, Michael C. Furtado, Janna M. McGaugh, Hoang Nguyen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the importance of information sources (e.g., Internet, social media) and their role in spreading misinformation. PURPOSE: To describe the information sources and frequency of use by health professional students and to compare users of dependable and nontrustworthy news sources on stressors, stress relievers, safety, and preventative activities, worries, and attitudes toward COVID-19. METHODS: 123 students from nursing (38%), medicine (33%), and health professions (28%) completed online surveys on disaster preparedness training, knowledge of the COVID-19 virus, and safety and prevention practices. Students were mostly female (81%), white (59%), and aged 21–30 yrs (72%). RESULTS: Students who relied on credible news sources scored higher on knowledge of the COVID-19 condition and reported less stress than their counterparts. CONCLUSION: The findings emphasize the importance of students avoiding untrustworthy news sources. Informed students are less stressed and can help initiate necessary safety measures in the areas they serve.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)97-103
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of allied health
Volume52
Issue number2
StatePublished - Jun 2023

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Medicine

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