Model Selection: Finding the Right Fit

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

There are numerous possible goals for building statistical models. Those statistical goals, the associated model types, and each statistical tool involved in model building come with its own assumptions and requirements. In turn, these requirements must be met if we are to ensure that our models produce meaningful, interpretable results. However, beyond these technical details is the intuition, and the additional set of tools and algorithms, used by the statistician, to build the contextually appropriate model: not only must we build an interpretable model, we must build a model that answers the particular question at hand and addresses the particular goal we have in mind. In this column we discuss the methods by which statisticians build models for description, risk factor identification, and prediction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)403-404
Number of pages2
JournalJournal of Foot and Ankle Surgery
Volume58
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2019

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Statistical Models
Intuition
Hand
Identification (Psychology)

Keywords

  • cross-validation
  • descriptive models
  • predictive modeling
  • risk factor
  • stepwise regression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Model Selection : Finding the Right Fit. / Jupiter, Daniel.

In: Journal of Foot and Ankle Surgery, Vol. 58, No. 2, 01.03.2019, p. 403-404.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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