Near vision impairment predicts cognitive decline: Data from the Hispanic established populations for epidemiologic studies of the elderly

Carlos A. Reyes-Ortiz, Yong Fang Kuo, Anthony R. DiNuzzo, Laura A. Ray, Mukaila Raji, Kyriakos Markides

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

82 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To estimate the association between sensory impairment and cognitive decline in older Mexican Americans. DESIGN: A prospective cohort study. SETTING: The Hispanic Established Populations for Epidemiologic Studies of the Elderly from five southwestern states. PARTICIPANTS: The sample consisted of 2,140 noninstitutionalized Mexican Americans aged 65 and older followed from 1993/1994 until 2000/2001. MEASUREMENTS: The outcome, cognitive function decline, was assessed using the Mini-Mental State Examination blind version (MMSE-blind) at baseline and at 2, 5, and 7 years of follow-up. Other variables were near vision, distance vision, hearing, demographics (age, sex, marital status, living arrangements, and education), depressive symptoms, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, stroke, heart attack, and functional status. A general linear mixed model was used to estimate cognitive decline at follow-up. RESULTS: In a fully adjusted model, MMSE-blind scores of subjects with near vision impairment decreased 0.62 points (standard error (SE) = 0.29, P = .03) over 2 years and decreased (slope of decline) 0.13 points (SE = 0.07, P = .045) more per year than scores of subjects with adequate near vision. Other independent predictors of cognitive decline were baseline MMSE-blind score, age, education, marital status, depressive symptoms, and number of activity of daily living limitations. CONCLUSION: Near vision impairment, but not distance vision or hearing impairments, was associated with cognitive decline in older Mexican Americans.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)681-686
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the American Geriatrics Society
Volume53
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2005

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Hispanic Americans
Epidemiologic Studies
Population
Marital Status
Depression
Education
Activities of Daily Living
Hearing Loss
Cognition
Hearing
Cognitive Dysfunction
Linear Models
Diabetes Mellitus
Cohort Studies
Stroke
Myocardial Infarction
Demography
Prospective Studies
Hypertension

Keywords

  • Cognitive decline
  • EPESE
  • MMSE-blind
  • Near vision
  • Older Mexican Americans

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Near vision impairment predicts cognitive decline : Data from the Hispanic established populations for epidemiologic studies of the elderly. / Reyes-Ortiz, Carlos A.; Kuo, Yong Fang; DiNuzzo, Anthony R.; Ray, Laura A.; Raji, Mukaila; Markides, Kyriakos.

In: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, Vol. 53, No. 4, 04.2005, p. 681-686.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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