Neurocysticercosis

Updates on epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

257 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Neurocysticercosis is now recognized as a common cause of neurologic disease in developing countries and the United States. The pathogenesis and clinical manifestations vary with the site of infection and accompanying host response. Inactive infection should be treated symptomatically. Active parenchymal infection results from an inflammatory reaction to the degenerating cysticercus and will also respond to symptomatic treatment. Controlled trials have not demonstrated a clinical benefit for antiparasitic drugs. Ventricular neurocysticercosis often causes obstructive hydrocephalus. Surgical intervention, especially cerebrospinal fluid diversion, is the key to management of hydrocephalus. Shunt failure may be less frequent when patients are treated with prednisone and/or antiparasitic drugs. Subarachnoid cysticercosis is associated with arachnoiditis. The arachnoiditis may result in meningitis, vasculitis with stroke, or hydrocephalus. Patients should be treated with corticosteroids, antiparasitic drugs, and shunting if hydrocephalus is present.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)187-206
Number of pages20
JournalAnnual Review of Medicine
Volume51
DOIs
StatePublished - 2000
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Neurocysticercosis
Antiparasitic Agents
Epidemiology
Hydrocephalus
Arachnoiditis
Cerebrospinal fluid
Infection
Cysticercus
Prednisone
Developing countries
Cysticercosis
Adrenal Cortex Hormones
Vasculitis
Nervous System Diseases
Meningitis
Developing Countries
Cerebrospinal Fluid
Stroke

Keywords

  • Albendazole
  • Praziquantel
  • Seizures

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Neurocysticercosis : Updates on epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management. / White, A. Clinton.

In: Annual Review of Medicine, Vol. 51, 2000, p. 187-206.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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