New developments in epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment of fascioliasis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose of Review: This review focuses on the recent developments in the epidemiology, burden of disease, diagnostic tests, and treatment of fascioliasis. Recent Findings: Recent epidemiologic data suggest that either the endemic areas are expanding or disease is being recognized in areas where it was not previously observed. In addition, recent data highlight the effects of fascioliasis on childhood anemia and nutrition. Diagnosis remains problematic, but newer diagnostic tests including antibody, antigen, and DNA detection tests may facilitate earlier diagnosis. Recent studies suggest that point-of-care testing may soon be possible. Treatment with triclabendazole is effective, but resistance is emerging in livestock and may pose a threat for patients. Summary: Fascioliasis continues to emerge as an important neglected disease, with new studies highlighting the under-recognized burden of disease. Further studies are needed on burden of disease, improved diagnosis, and alternative to triclabendazole treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)518-522
Number of pages5
JournalCurrent Opinion in Infectious Diseases
Volume25
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2012

Fingerprint

Fascioliasis
triclabendazole
Epidemiology
Routine Diagnostic Tests
Neglected Diseases
Livestock
Therapeutics
Anemia
Early Diagnosis
Antigens
Antibodies
DNA

Keywords

  • Fasciola hepatica
  • trematode
  • triclabendazole
  • zoonosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

New developments in epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment of fascioliasis. / Cabada, Miguel; White, A. Clinton.

In: Current Opinion in Infectious Diseases, Vol. 25, No. 5, 10.2012, p. 518-522.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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