Nipah virus matrix protein influences fusogenicity and is essential for particle infectivity and stability

Erik Dietzel, Larissa Kolesnikova, Bevan Sawatsky, Anja Heiner, Michael Weis, Gary P. Kobinger, Stephan Becker, Veronika von Messling, Andrea Maisner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

25 Scopus citations

Abstract

Nipah virus (NiV) causes fatal encephalitic infections in humans. To characterize the role of the matrix (M) protein in the viral life cycle, we generated a reverse genetics system based on NiV strain Malaysia. Using an enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP)-expressingMprotein-deleted NiV, we observed a slightly increased cell-cell fusion, slow replication kinetics, and significantly reduced peak titers compared to the parental virus. While increased amounts of viral proteins were found in the supernatant of cells infected with M-deleted NiV, the infectivity-to-particle ratio was more than 100-fold reduced, and the particles were less thermostable and of more irregular morphology. Taken together, our data demonstrate that theMprotein is not absolutely required for the production of cell-free NiV but is necessary for proper assembly and release of stable infectious NiV particles.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2514-2522
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of virology
Volume90
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2016
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Immunology
  • Insect Science
  • Virology

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