No correlation between initial arterial carboxyhemoglobin level and degree of lung injury following ovine burn and smoke inhalation

Matthias Lange, Robert A. Cox, Daniel L. Traber, Atsumori Hamahata, Yoshimitsu Nakano, Lillian D. Traber, Perenlei Enkhbaatar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Fire victims often suffer from burn injury and concomitant inhalation trauma, the latter significantly contributing to the morbidity and mortality in these patients. Measurement of blood carboxyhemoglobin levels has been proposed as a diagnostic marker to verify and, perhaps, quantify the degree of lung injury following inhalation trauma. However, this correlation has not yet been sufficiently validated. A total of 77 chronically instrumented sheep received sham injury, smoke inhalation injury, or combined burn and inhalation trauma following an established protocol. Arterial carboxyhemoglobin concentrations were determined directly after injury and correlated to several clinical and histopathological determinants of lung injury that were detected 48 hours post-injury. The injury induced severe impairment of pulmonary gas exchange and increases in transvascular fluid flux, lung water content, and airway obstruction scores. No significant correlations were detected between initial carboxyhemoglobin levels and all measured clinical and histopathological determinants of lung injury. In conclusion, the amount of arterial carboxyhemoglobin concentration cannot predict the degree of lung injury at 48 hours after ovine burn and smoke inhalation trauma.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)99-104
Number of pages6
JournalExperimental Lung Research
Volume40
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2014

Keywords

  • Carbon monoxide
  • Inhalation injury
  • Lung injury
  • Sheep

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Clinical Biochemistry

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