Norepinephrine and serotonin release upon impact injury to rat spinal cord

D. Liu, V. Valadez, L. S. Sorkin, D. J. McAdoo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

44 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Microdialysis sampling was used to characterize the release of norepinephrine and serotonin upon impact injury to the rat spinal cord. Increases in extracellular norepinephrine concentrations in response to injury were small and of short duration. In contrast, serotonin concentrations quickly rose 35-90 times following injury and took 30-45 min to return to control levels. Bleeding caused by injury was probably the major source of the increased serotonin levels. Our results allow a role for serotonin in secondary damage upon injury to the spinal cord but suggest that norepinephrine is not a very significant contributor to such damage.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)219-227
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Neurotrauma
Volume7
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1990

Fingerprint

Serotonin
Spinal Cord
Norepinephrine
Wounds and Injuries
Microdialysis
Spinal Cord Injuries
Hemorrhage

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Liu, D., Valadez, V., Sorkin, L. S., & McAdoo, D. J. (1990). Norepinephrine and serotonin release upon impact injury to rat spinal cord. Journal of Neurotrauma, 7(4), 219-227.

Norepinephrine and serotonin release upon impact injury to rat spinal cord. / Liu, D.; Valadez, V.; Sorkin, L. S.; McAdoo, D. J.

In: Journal of Neurotrauma, Vol. 7, No. 4, 1990, p. 219-227.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Liu, D, Valadez, V, Sorkin, LS & McAdoo, DJ 1990, 'Norepinephrine and serotonin release upon impact injury to rat spinal cord', Journal of Neurotrauma, vol. 7, no. 4, pp. 219-227.
Liu, D. ; Valadez, V. ; Sorkin, L. S. ; McAdoo, D. J. / Norepinephrine and serotonin release upon impact injury to rat spinal cord. In: Journal of Neurotrauma. 1990 ; Vol. 7, No. 4. pp. 219-227.
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