Novel Risk Markers and Long-Term Outcomes of Delirium: The Successful Aging after Elective Surgery (SAGES) Study Design and Methods

Eva M. Schmitt, Edward R. Marcantonio, David C. Alsop, Richard N. Jones, Selwyn O. Rogers, Tamara G. Fong, Eran Metzger, Sharon K. Inouye

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

58 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: Delirium, a costly, life-threatening, and potentially preventable condition, is a common complication for older adults following major surgery. Although the basic epidemiology of delirium after surgery has been defined, the contribution of delirium to long term outcomes remains uncertain, and novel biomarkers from plasma and neuroimaging have yet to be examined. This program project was designed to contribute to our understanding of the complex multifactorial syndrome of delirium. Design: Long term prospective cohort study. Setting: Three academic medical centers (2 hospitals and 1 coordinating center). Participants: Patients without recognized dementia (targeted cohort = 550 patients) age 70 and older scheduled to undergo elective major surgery are assessed at baseline before surgery, daily during their hospital stay, and for 18 to 36 months after discharge. Measurements: The Successful Aging after Elective Surgery (SAGES) study is an innovative, interdisciplinary study that includes biomarkers, neuroimaging, cognitive reserve markers, and serial neuropsychological testing to examine the contribution of delirium to long term cognitive and functional decline. The primary goal is to examine the contribution of delirium to long term cognitive and functional decline. In addition, novel risk markers for delirium are being examined, including plasma biomarkers (eg, cytokines, proteomics), advanced neuroimaging markers (eg, volumetric, white matter hyperintensity, noncontrast blood flow, and diffusion tensor measures), and cognitive reserve markers (eg, education, occupation, lifetime activities). Conclusion: Results from this study will contribute to a fuller understanding of the etiology and prognosis of delirium. Ultimately, we hope this project will provide the groundwork for future development of prevention and treatment strategies for delirium, designed to minimize the long term negative impact of delirium in older adults.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of the American Medical Directors Association
Volume13
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Delirium
Cognitive Reserve
Neuroimaging
Biomarkers
Interdisciplinary Studies
Occupations
Proteomics
Dementia
Length of Stay
Epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Prospective Studies
Cytokines
Education

Keywords

  • Delirium
  • Dementia
  • Elderly
  • Long term outcomes
  • Risk factors
  • Surgery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Nursing(all)
  • Health Policy

Cite this

Novel Risk Markers and Long-Term Outcomes of Delirium : The Successful Aging after Elective Surgery (SAGES) Study Design and Methods. / Schmitt, Eva M.; Marcantonio, Edward R.; Alsop, David C.; Jones, Richard N.; Rogers, Selwyn O.; Fong, Tamara G.; Metzger, Eran; Inouye, Sharon K.

In: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, Vol. 13, No. 9, 11.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Schmitt, Eva M. ; Marcantonio, Edward R. ; Alsop, David C. ; Jones, Richard N. ; Rogers, Selwyn O. ; Fong, Tamara G. ; Metzger, Eran ; Inouye, Sharon K. / Novel Risk Markers and Long-Term Outcomes of Delirium : The Successful Aging after Elective Surgery (SAGES) Study Design and Methods. In: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association. 2012 ; Vol. 13, No. 9.
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