Nutrition support strategies for severely burned patients

Jong Lee, Debbie Benjamin, David Herndon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Significant weight loss is a common complication of a major burn injury. Before the modern era of early enteral nutrition support, such a complication contributed significantly to impaired wound healing, raised risk of infectious morbidity, and ultimately increased mortality. Nutrition management of the burn patient is designed to promote wound healing while minimizing loss of lean body mass. The burn patient characteristically demonstrates an increase in energy expenditure after the initial injury and period of resuscitation. Studies have demonstrated that early institution of enteral feeding can attenuate the stress response, abate hypermetabolism, and improve patient outcome.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)325-330
Number of pages6
JournalNutrition in Clinical Practice
Volume20
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2005

Fingerprint

enteral feeding
Enteral Nutrition
nutrition
tissue repair
Wound Healing
burns (injuries)
lean body mass
Wounds and Injuries
Resuscitation
energy expenditure
Energy Metabolism
morbidity
Weight Loss
stress response
weight loss
Morbidity
Mortality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Food Science

Cite this

Nutrition support strategies for severely burned patients. / Lee, Jong; Benjamin, Debbie; Herndon, David.

In: Nutrition in Clinical Practice, Vol. 20, No. 3, 2005, p. 325-330.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lee, Jong ; Benjamin, Debbie ; Herndon, David. / Nutrition support strategies for severely burned patients. In: Nutrition in Clinical Practice. 2005 ; Vol. 20, No. 3. pp. 325-330.
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