Obesity Risk Knowledge, Weight Misperception, and Diet and Health-Related Attitudes among Women Intending to Become Pregnant

Abbey Berenson, Ali M. Pohlmeier, Tabassum H. Laz, Mahbubur Rahman, George Saade

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Our aim was to evaluate obesity risk knowledge, weight misperception, and diet and health-related attitudes among women intending to become pregnant compared to those not intending to become pregnant. Design: We conducted a cross-sectional survey of health behaviors, including obesity risk knowledge, weight misperception, and diet and health-related attitudes among women (aged 16 to 40 years) attending reproductive health clinics in southeast Texas. Data were collected through self-administered questionnaires and chart review. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to examine the association between pregnancy intention and obesity risk knowledge, weight misperception, and health-related attitudes after adjusting for age, race, income, and gravidity. Results: Overall, 1,726 women completed the survey, of which 1,420 responded to a question on pregnancy intention. Of these, 126 stated they were intending to become pregnant. Obesity risk knowledge (adjusted odds ratio =1.14; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.74 to 1.77) and weight misperception (adjusted odds ratio=1.17; 95% CI 0.75 to 1.83) did not differ between women intending and not intending to become pregnant. In addition, diet and health-related attitudes did not differ between these two groups (P>0.05 for all). Among women intending to become pregnant, 51% had low obesity risk knowledge and 31% misperceived their body weight. Further, 76% of these women felt confused about what constitutes a healthy diet, although 47% believed that their current diet was healthy and saw no reason to change their current eating patterns. While weight misperception did not differ significantly between the two groups, overweight women intending to become pregnant were more likely to misperceive their weight than obese women intending to become pregnant (71% vs 10%; P<0.001). Conclusions: There is a need for improved preconception counseling, especially for women intending to become pregnant, regarding the risks associated with being overweight or obese, misperception of body weight, and negative diet and health-related attitudes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Dec 8 2014

Fingerprint

Attitude to Health
obesity
Obesity
Diet
Weights and Measures
diet
odds ratio
confidence interval
Odds Ratio
Body Weight
pregnancy
Confidence Intervals
Gravidity
Pregnancy
body weight
counseling
healthy diet
Reproductive Health
Health Behavior
eating habits

Keywords

  • Obesity risk knowledge
  • Preconception
  • Pregnancy intention
  • Weight misperception

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

@article{69a219c8346c43fcb23fb673744918fc,
title = "Obesity Risk Knowledge, Weight Misperception, and Diet and Health-Related Attitudes among Women Intending to Become Pregnant",
abstract = "Objective: Our aim was to evaluate obesity risk knowledge, weight misperception, and diet and health-related attitudes among women intending to become pregnant compared to those not intending to become pregnant. Design: We conducted a cross-sectional survey of health behaviors, including obesity risk knowledge, weight misperception, and diet and health-related attitudes among women (aged 16 to 40 years) attending reproductive health clinics in southeast Texas. Data were collected through self-administered questionnaires and chart review. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to examine the association between pregnancy intention and obesity risk knowledge, weight misperception, and health-related attitudes after adjusting for age, race, income, and gravidity. Results: Overall, 1,726 women completed the survey, of which 1,420 responded to a question on pregnancy intention. Of these, 126 stated they were intending to become pregnant. Obesity risk knowledge (adjusted odds ratio =1.14; 95{\%} confidence interval [CI] 0.74 to 1.77) and weight misperception (adjusted odds ratio=1.17; 95{\%} CI 0.75 to 1.83) did not differ between women intending and not intending to become pregnant. In addition, diet and health-related attitudes did not differ between these two groups (P>0.05 for all). Among women intending to become pregnant, 51{\%} had low obesity risk knowledge and 31{\%} misperceived their body weight. Further, 76{\%} of these women felt confused about what constitutes a healthy diet, although 47{\%} believed that their current diet was healthy and saw no reason to change their current eating patterns. While weight misperception did not differ significantly between the two groups, overweight women intending to become pregnant were more likely to misperceive their weight than obese women intending to become pregnant (71{\%} vs 10{\%}; P<0.001). Conclusions: There is a need for improved preconception counseling, especially for women intending to become pregnant, regarding the risks associated with being overweight or obese, misperception of body weight, and negative diet and health-related attitudes.",
keywords = "Obesity risk knowledge, Preconception, Pregnancy intention, Weight misperception",
author = "Abbey Berenson and Pohlmeier, {Ali M.} and Laz, {Tabassum H.} and Mahbubur Rahman and George Saade",
year = "2014",
month = "12",
day = "8",
doi = "10.1016/j.jand.2015.04.023",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics",
issn = "2212-2672",
publisher = "Elsevier USA",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Obesity Risk Knowledge, Weight Misperception, and Diet and Health-Related Attitudes among Women Intending to Become Pregnant

AU - Berenson, Abbey

AU - Pohlmeier, Ali M.

AU - Laz, Tabassum H.

AU - Rahman, Mahbubur

AU - Saade, George

PY - 2014/12/8

Y1 - 2014/12/8

N2 - Objective: Our aim was to evaluate obesity risk knowledge, weight misperception, and diet and health-related attitudes among women intending to become pregnant compared to those not intending to become pregnant. Design: We conducted a cross-sectional survey of health behaviors, including obesity risk knowledge, weight misperception, and diet and health-related attitudes among women (aged 16 to 40 years) attending reproductive health clinics in southeast Texas. Data were collected through self-administered questionnaires and chart review. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to examine the association between pregnancy intention and obesity risk knowledge, weight misperception, and health-related attitudes after adjusting for age, race, income, and gravidity. Results: Overall, 1,726 women completed the survey, of which 1,420 responded to a question on pregnancy intention. Of these, 126 stated they were intending to become pregnant. Obesity risk knowledge (adjusted odds ratio =1.14; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.74 to 1.77) and weight misperception (adjusted odds ratio=1.17; 95% CI 0.75 to 1.83) did not differ between women intending and not intending to become pregnant. In addition, diet and health-related attitudes did not differ between these two groups (P>0.05 for all). Among women intending to become pregnant, 51% had low obesity risk knowledge and 31% misperceived their body weight. Further, 76% of these women felt confused about what constitutes a healthy diet, although 47% believed that their current diet was healthy and saw no reason to change their current eating patterns. While weight misperception did not differ significantly between the two groups, overweight women intending to become pregnant were more likely to misperceive their weight than obese women intending to become pregnant (71% vs 10%; P<0.001). Conclusions: There is a need for improved preconception counseling, especially for women intending to become pregnant, regarding the risks associated with being overweight or obese, misperception of body weight, and negative diet and health-related attitudes.

AB - Objective: Our aim was to evaluate obesity risk knowledge, weight misperception, and diet and health-related attitudes among women intending to become pregnant compared to those not intending to become pregnant. Design: We conducted a cross-sectional survey of health behaviors, including obesity risk knowledge, weight misperception, and diet and health-related attitudes among women (aged 16 to 40 years) attending reproductive health clinics in southeast Texas. Data were collected through self-administered questionnaires and chart review. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to examine the association between pregnancy intention and obesity risk knowledge, weight misperception, and health-related attitudes after adjusting for age, race, income, and gravidity. Results: Overall, 1,726 women completed the survey, of which 1,420 responded to a question on pregnancy intention. Of these, 126 stated they were intending to become pregnant. Obesity risk knowledge (adjusted odds ratio =1.14; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.74 to 1.77) and weight misperception (adjusted odds ratio=1.17; 95% CI 0.75 to 1.83) did not differ between women intending and not intending to become pregnant. In addition, diet and health-related attitudes did not differ between these two groups (P>0.05 for all). Among women intending to become pregnant, 51% had low obesity risk knowledge and 31% misperceived their body weight. Further, 76% of these women felt confused about what constitutes a healthy diet, although 47% believed that their current diet was healthy and saw no reason to change their current eating patterns. While weight misperception did not differ significantly between the two groups, overweight women intending to become pregnant were more likely to misperceive their weight than obese women intending to become pregnant (71% vs 10%; P<0.001). Conclusions: There is a need for improved preconception counseling, especially for women intending to become pregnant, regarding the risks associated with being overweight or obese, misperception of body weight, and negative diet and health-related attitudes.

KW - Obesity risk knowledge

KW - Preconception

KW - Pregnancy intention

KW - Weight misperception

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84931088933&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84931088933&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jand.2015.04.023

DO - 10.1016/j.jand.2015.04.023

M3 - Article

JO - Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics

JF - Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics

SN - 2212-2672

ER -