Old world hantaviruses in rodents in New Orleans, Louisiana

Robert Cross, Bradley Waffa, Ashley Freeman, Claudia Riegel, Lina M. Moses, Andrew Bennett, David Safronetz, Elizabeth R. Fischer, Heinz Feldmann, Thomas G. Voss, Daniel G. Bausch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Seoul virus, an Old World hantavirus, is maintained in brown rats and causes a mild form of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) in humans. We captured rodents in New Orleans, Louisiana and tested them for the presence of Old World hantaviruses by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with sequencing, cell culture, and electron microscopy; 6 (3.4%) of 178 rodents captured - all brown rats - were positive for a Seoul virus variant previously coined Tchoupitoulas virus, which was noted in rodents in New Orleans in the 1980s. The finding of Tchoupitoulas virus in New Orleans over 25 years since its first discovery suggests stable endemicity in the city. Although the degree to which this virus causes human infection and disease remains unknown, repeated demonstration of Seoul virus in rodent populations, recent cases of laboratory-confirmed HFRS in some US cities, and a possible link with hypertensive renal disease warrant additional investigation in both rodents and humans.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)897-901
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Volume90
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Hantavirus
Seoul virus
Rodentia
Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome
Viruses
Reverse Transcription
Electron Microscopy
Cell Culture Techniques
Kidney
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Infection
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Virology

Cite this

Cross, R., Waffa, B., Freeman, A., Riegel, C., Moses, L. M., Bennett, A., ... Bausch, D. G. (2014). Old world hantaviruses in rodents in New Orleans, Louisiana. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 90(5), 897-901. https://doi.org/10.4269/ajtmh.13-0683

Old world hantaviruses in rodents in New Orleans, Louisiana. / Cross, Robert; Waffa, Bradley; Freeman, Ashley; Riegel, Claudia; Moses, Lina M.; Bennett, Andrew; Safronetz, David; Fischer, Elizabeth R.; Feldmann, Heinz; Voss, Thomas G.; Bausch, Daniel G.

In: American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, Vol. 90, No. 5, 01.01.2014, p. 897-901.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cross, R, Waffa, B, Freeman, A, Riegel, C, Moses, LM, Bennett, A, Safronetz, D, Fischer, ER, Feldmann, H, Voss, TG & Bausch, DG 2014, 'Old world hantaviruses in rodents in New Orleans, Louisiana', American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, vol. 90, no. 5, pp. 897-901. https://doi.org/10.4269/ajtmh.13-0683
Cross, Robert ; Waffa, Bradley ; Freeman, Ashley ; Riegel, Claudia ; Moses, Lina M. ; Bennett, Andrew ; Safronetz, David ; Fischer, Elizabeth R. ; Feldmann, Heinz ; Voss, Thomas G. ; Bausch, Daniel G. / Old world hantaviruses in rodents in New Orleans, Louisiana. In: American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. 2014 ; Vol. 90, No. 5. pp. 897-901.
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