Older adults’ demographic social determinants of organizing personal healthcare self-care

Huey Ming Tzeng, Udoka Okpalauwaekwe, Anne Barker, Cindy Feng, Sandra Lynn Jansen, Chang Yi Yin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background Patients’ self-care capacity could influence their quality of life and outcomes such as emergency room use. Purpose Explore the relationship between older adults’ demographic characteristics (as possible social determinants of health) and their perceived importance and desirability of, and ability to perform, eight self-care behaviors for organizing personal health care. Method Authors conducted a secondary data analysis from a cross-sectional study that surveyed community-dwelling adults (N=123 adults age 65 or older) in the southern United States (2015-2016). Data were collected with the Patient Action Inventory for Self-Care. Univariate and multiple logistic regression analyses were conducted. Results Older adults’ residence in an urban area, advancing age, separated marital status, and not having a high school education were associated with negative responses regarding the importance and desirability of, and ability to perform, at least one of five self-care behaviors related to organizing their health care. Limitations and Implications Findings may not be generalizable to other regions or other populations. Medical-surgical nurses should consider older adults may respond to medical and healthcare instructions and interventions based on their demographic characteristics and developmental life stage. Conclusion Older adults’ advancing age, marital status, education, and residential area could be social determinants of health that influence their perceptions in performing self-care actions to organize their personal health care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)321-326
Number of pages6
JournalMEDSURG Nursing
Volume29
Issue number5
StatePublished - Sep 1 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Medical–Surgical

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