Older adults’ suggestions to engage other older adults in health and healthcare: A qualitative study conducted in western Canada

Huey-Ming Tzeng, Udoka Okpalauwaekwe, Chang Yi Yin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim: This qualitative study reports identified themes from suggestions made by 533 Canadian older adults, aged $65 years in response to the open-ended question contained in a Saskatchewan Telephone Survey: “What suggestions can you make to engage someone in their health and healthcare?”. Background: In 2016, seniors accounted for 16.9% of the Canadian population. As Canadians age over the next 30 years, emergency room visits are predicted to increase by 40%, outpacing the expected 30% population growth. Avoiding this increase could save the nation about $210 million annually. A recent US study reported that the ability of seniors to carry out self-care actions predicted lower likelihood of emergency department use within 3 months. Materials and methods: We conducted a secondary data analysis based on a province-wide, cross-sectional Saskatchewan (Canada) Telephone Survey of seniors’ self-care needs conducted in March–June 2018 (N=1,000). Results were analyzed using qualitative thematic content analysis. Data were charted and coded separately by two researchers; coding conflicts were resolved by consensus. Results: A total of 533 seniors answered the open-ended question. Content analysis resulted in 11 contextual content areas with 956 total suggestions. Five key themes emerged, which included the following: feasible healthcare access, being proactive toward healthy living, having social support systems, being more open to alternative medicine, and other self-care options, and having more trained healthcare professionals to care for seniors. Conclusion: This study reveals facilitators and challenges that currently face seniors. Seniors want equitable access to professional healthcare services and an environment that fosters self-care actions in everyday living. There is a gap in supports that would assist seniors to engage in their health and healthcare. Additional research on this issue could further inform health and human service providers to develop patient-centered strategies for promoting self-care among seniors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)331-337
Number of pages7
JournalPatient Preference and Adherence
Volume13
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Self Care
Canada
Delivery of Health Care
Health
Saskatchewan
health
Telephone
Hospital Emergency Service
Population Growth
Complementary Therapies
telephone
Social Support
content analysis
Health Services
Research Personnel
alternative medicine
secondary analysis
population growth
service provider
Research

Keywords

  • Active living
  • Alternative medicine
  • Canadian healthcare system
  • Care navigation
  • Health care professional training
  • Healthcare access
  • Healthy living
  • Patient empowerment
  • Self-management
  • Social support

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics (miscellaneous)
  • Health Policy

Cite this

Older adults’ suggestions to engage other older adults in health and healthcare : A qualitative study conducted in western Canada. / Tzeng, Huey-Ming; Okpalauwaekwe, Udoka; Yin, Chang Yi.

In: Patient Preference and Adherence, Vol. 13, 01.01.2019, p. 331-337.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Aim: This qualitative study reports identified themes from suggestions made by 533 Canadian older adults, aged $65 years in response to the open-ended question contained in a Saskatchewan Telephone Survey: “What suggestions can you make to engage someone in their health and healthcare?”. Background: In 2016, seniors accounted for 16.9{\%} of the Canadian population. As Canadians age over the next 30 years, emergency room visits are predicted to increase by 40{\%}, outpacing the expected 30{\%} population growth. Avoiding this increase could save the nation about $210 million annually. A recent US study reported that the ability of seniors to carry out self-care actions predicted lower likelihood of emergency department use within 3 months. Materials and methods: We conducted a secondary data analysis based on a province-wide, cross-sectional Saskatchewan (Canada) Telephone Survey of seniors’ self-care needs conducted in March–June 2018 (N=1,000). Results were analyzed using qualitative thematic content analysis. Data were charted and coded separately by two researchers; coding conflicts were resolved by consensus. Results: A total of 533 seniors answered the open-ended question. Content analysis resulted in 11 contextual content areas with 956 total suggestions. Five key themes emerged, which included the following: feasible healthcare access, being proactive toward healthy living, having social support systems, being more open to alternative medicine, and other self-care options, and having more trained healthcare professionals to care for seniors. Conclusion: This study reveals facilitators and challenges that currently face seniors. Seniors want equitable access to professional healthcare services and an environment that fosters self-care actions in everyday living. There is a gap in supports that would assist seniors to engage in their health and healthcare. Additional research on this issue could further inform health and human service providers to develop patient-centered strategies for promoting self-care among seniors.",
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