Online faculty development for creating E-learning materials

Virginia Niebuhr, Bruce Niebuhr, Julie Trumble, Mary Jo Urbani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Faculty who want to develop e-learning materials face pedagogical challenges of transforming instruction for the online environment, especially as many have never experienced online learning themselves. They face technical challenges of learning new software and time challenges of not all being able to be in the same place at the same time to learn these new skills. The objective of the Any Day Any Place Teaching (ADAPT) faculty development program was to create an online experience in which faculty could learn to produce e-learning materials.

METHODS: The ADAPT curriculum included units on instructional design, copyright principles and peer review, all for the online environment, and units on specific software tools. Participants experienced asynchronous and synchronous methods, including a learning management system, PC-based videoconferencing, online discussions, desktop sharing, an online toolbox and optional face-to-face labs. Project outcomes were e-learning materials developed and participants' evaluations of the experience. Likert scale responses for five instructional units (quantitative) were analyzed for distance from neutral using one-sample t-tests. Interview data (qualitative) were analyzed with assurance of data trustworthiness and thematic analysis techniques.

RESULTS: Participants were 27 interprofessional faculty. They evaluated the program instruction as easy to access, engaging and logically presented. They reported increased confidence in new skills and increased awareness of copyright issues, yet continued to have time management challenges and remained uncomfortable about peer review. They produced 22 new instructional materials.

DISCUSSION: Online faculty development methods are helpful for faculty learning to create e-learning materials. Recommendations are made to increase the success of such a faculty development program.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)255-261
Number of pages7
JournalEducation for Health: Change in Learning and Practice
Volume27
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2014

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Learning
electronic learning
learning
peer review
Peer Review
Teaching
Software
instruction
time management
Videoconferencing
Time Management
trustworthiness
PC
Curriculum
experience
confidence
curriculum
Interviews
interview
evaluation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Online faculty development for creating E-learning materials. / Niebuhr, Virginia; Niebuhr, Bruce; Trumble, Julie; Urbani, Mary Jo.

In: Education for Health: Change in Learning and Practice, Vol. 27, No. 3, 01.09.2014, p. 255-261.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Niebuhr, Virginia ; Niebuhr, Bruce ; Trumble, Julie ; Urbani, Mary Jo. / Online faculty development for creating E-learning materials. In: Education for Health: Change in Learning and Practice. 2014 ; Vol. 27, No. 3. pp. 255-261.
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