Opposite regulation of conditioned place preference and intravenous drug self-administration in rodent models: Motivational and non-motivational examples

Thomas A. Green, Michael T. Bardo

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Although developed from a common antecedent, conditioned place preference (CPP) and intravenous drug self-administration (SA) represent different behavioral paradigms, each with strong face validity. The field has treated results from these studies largely interchangeably; however, there is considerable evidence of opposite modulation of CPP vs. SA. This review outlines four manipulations that differentially affect CPP and SA based on alterations of motivation. These examples are contrasted with one example of differential CPP and SA results that can be explained by simple parallel shifts in dose-response functions. The final two examples have yet to be classified as motivation-based or parallel shifts. Important aspects, including motivation, volitional control of drug administration, reward, and the role of cues are discussed. One major conclusion of this paper is that explanations for apparent discrepancies between CPP and SA require full dose effect functions and assessment of PR breakpoints. Overall, this manuscript offers a more nuanced insight into how CPP and SA can be used to study different aspects of substance use disorders.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)89-98
Number of pages10
JournalNeuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews
Volume116
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2020

Keywords

  • Addiction
  • Animal models
  • Conditioned place preference
  • Discrepancies
  • Dose-response curves dose effect
  • Dose-response functions
  • Drug abuse
  • Incentive salience
  • Incentive sensitization
  • Motivation
  • Reinforcement
  • Reward
  • Self-administration

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

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