Optoacoustic monitoring of central and peripheral venous oxygenation during simulated hemorrhage

Andrey Petrov, Michael Kinsky, Donald Prough, Yuriy Petrov, Irene Y. Petrov, S. Nan Henkel, Roger Seeton, Michael G. Salter, Muzna Khan, Rinat Esenaliev

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Circulatory shock may be fatal unless promptly recognized and treated. The most commonly used indicators of shock (hypotension and tachycardia) lack sensitivity and specificity. In the initial stages of shock, the body compensates by reducing blood flow to the peripheral (skin, muscle, etc.) circulation in order to preserve vital organ (brain, heart, liver) perfusion. Characteristically, this can be observed by a greater reduction in peripheral venous oxygenation (for instance, the axillary vein) compared to central venous oxygenation (the internal jugular vein). While invasive measurements of oxygenation are accurate, they lack practicality and are not without complications. We have developed a novel optoacoustic system that noninvasively determines oxygenation in specific veins. In order to test this application, we used lower body negative pressure (LBNP) system, which simulates hemorrhage by exerting a variable amount of suction on the lower body, thereby reducing the volume of blood available for central circulation. Restoration of normal blood flow occurs promptly upon cessation of LBNP. Using two optoacoustic probes, guided by ultrasound imaging, we simultaneously monitored oxygenation in the axillary and internal jugular veins (IJV). LBNP began at -20 mmHg, thereafter was reduced in a step-wise fashion (up to 30 min). The optoacoustically measured axillary oxygenation decreased with LBNP, whereas IJV oxygenation remained relatively constant. These results indicate that our optoacoustic system may provide safe and rapid measurement of peripheral and central venous oxygenation and diagnosis of shock with high specificity and sensitivity.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProgress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE
PublisherSPIE
Volume8943
ISBN (Print)9780819498564
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014
EventPhotons Plus Ultrasound: Imaging and Sensing 2014 - San Francisco, CA, United States
Duration: Feb 2 2014Feb 5 2014

Other

OtherPhotons Plus Ultrasound: Imaging and Sensing 2014
CountryUnited States
CitySan Francisco, CA
Period2/2/142/5/14

Fingerprint

Lower Body Negative Pressure
hemorrhages
Oxygenation
Photoacoustic effect
oxygenation
lower body negative pressure
Shock
Jugular Veins
Hemorrhage
veins
Monitoring
Axillary Vein
shock
Sensitivity and Specificity
Blood
Suction
blood flow
Blood Volume
Tachycardia
Hypotension

Keywords

  • Central venous oxygenation
  • Circulatory shock
  • Noninvasive monitoring
  • Optoacoustics
  • Ultrasound imaging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Biomaterials
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Petrov, A., Kinsky, M., Prough, D., Petrov, Y., Petrov, I. Y., Henkel, S. N., ... Esenaliev, R. (2014). Optoacoustic monitoring of central and peripheral venous oxygenation during simulated hemorrhage. In Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE (Vol. 8943). [894336] SPIE. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2045358

Optoacoustic monitoring of central and peripheral venous oxygenation during simulated hemorrhage. / Petrov, Andrey; Kinsky, Michael; Prough, Donald; Petrov, Yuriy; Petrov, Irene Y.; Henkel, S. Nan; Seeton, Roger; Salter, Michael G.; Khan, Muzna; Esenaliev, Rinat.

Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. Vol. 8943 SPIE, 2014. 894336.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Petrov, A, Kinsky, M, Prough, D, Petrov, Y, Petrov, IY, Henkel, SN, Seeton, R, Salter, MG, Khan, M & Esenaliev, R 2014, Optoacoustic monitoring of central and peripheral venous oxygenation during simulated hemorrhage. in Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. vol. 8943, 894336, SPIE, Photons Plus Ultrasound: Imaging and Sensing 2014, San Francisco, CA, United States, 2/2/14. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2045358
Petrov A, Kinsky M, Prough D, Petrov Y, Petrov IY, Henkel SN et al. Optoacoustic monitoring of central and peripheral venous oxygenation during simulated hemorrhage. In Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. Vol. 8943. SPIE. 2014. 894336 https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2045358
Petrov, Andrey ; Kinsky, Michael ; Prough, Donald ; Petrov, Yuriy ; Petrov, Irene Y. ; Henkel, S. Nan ; Seeton, Roger ; Salter, Michael G. ; Khan, Muzna ; Esenaliev, Rinat. / Optoacoustic monitoring of central and peripheral venous oxygenation during simulated hemorrhage. Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. Vol. 8943 SPIE, 2014.
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