Oral glutamine decreases bacterial translocation and improves survival in experimental gut-origin sepsis

L. Gianotti, J. W. Alexander, R. Gennari, Tonyia Eaves-Pyles, G. F. Babcock

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

165 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Glutamine has been shown to be an important dietary component for the maintenance of gut metabolism. The purpose of this study was to assess the potential benefit of glutamine-enriched diets on experimental gut- derived sepsis. Methods: BALB/c mice were fed either 2% glutamine- supplemented or 1% glycine-supplemented (near-isonitrogenous control) AIN- 76A diets. Control mice received either nonsupplemented AIN-76A or regular Purina Rodent Laboratory Mouse Chow 5001 diets. After 10 days of feeding, the mice were transfused with allogeneic blood (from C3H/HeJ mice), and the feeding protocols were continued for an additional 5 days. The mice then underwent gavage with 1010 Escherichia coli labeled with either indium-111 oxine or [14C] glucose followed immediately by a 20% burn injury. Some mice were observed 10 days postburn for survival rates. Others were killed 4 hours after burn, and the mesenteric lymph nodes, liver, and spleen were harvested to determine radionuclide and bacterial colony counts. The percentages of viable (translocated E coli were also calculated. Results: Mice fed glutamine-enriched diets had a lower degree of translocation (as measured by both radionuclide and bacterial counts) to the tissues than did the other groups and had an improvement in the ability to kill translocated E coli (as measured by the percentage of viable bacteria). Survival was significantly higher in the group fed 2% glutamine (81%) compared with the groups fed 1% glycine (36%), AIN-76A (35%), and Purina Rodent Laboratory Mouse Chow 5001 (36%) diets (p < .004). Conclusions: Glutamine-supplemented enteral diets may exert important benefits in preventing gut-origin sepsis after trauma.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)69-74
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition
Volume19
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Bacterial Translocation
Glutamine
glutamine
mouth
Sepsis
digestive system
mice
Diet
Bacterial Load
diet
Escherichia coli
Radioisotopes
Glycine
radionuclides
glycine (amino acid)
Rodentia
rodents
indium
burns (injuries)
Inbred C3H Mouse

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Oral glutamine decreases bacterial translocation and improves survival in experimental gut-origin sepsis. / Gianotti, L.; Alexander, J. W.; Gennari, R.; Eaves-Pyles, Tonyia; Babcock, G. F.

In: Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, Vol. 19, No. 1, 1995, p. 69-74.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background: Glutamine has been shown to be an important dietary component for the maintenance of gut metabolism. The purpose of this study was to assess the potential benefit of glutamine-enriched diets on experimental gut- derived sepsis. Methods: BALB/c mice were fed either 2{\%} glutamine- supplemented or 1{\%} glycine-supplemented (near-isonitrogenous control) AIN- 76A diets. Control mice received either nonsupplemented AIN-76A or regular Purina Rodent Laboratory Mouse Chow 5001 diets. After 10 days of feeding, the mice were transfused with allogeneic blood (from C3H/HeJ mice), and the feeding protocols were continued for an additional 5 days. The mice then underwent gavage with 1010 Escherichia coli labeled with either indium-111 oxine or [14C] glucose followed immediately by a 20{\%} burn injury. Some mice were observed 10 days postburn for survival rates. Others were killed 4 hours after burn, and the mesenteric lymph nodes, liver, and spleen were harvested to determine radionuclide and bacterial colony counts. The percentages of viable (translocated E coli were also calculated. Results: Mice fed glutamine-enriched diets had a lower degree of translocation (as measured by both radionuclide and bacterial counts) to the tissues than did the other groups and had an improvement in the ability to kill translocated E coli (as measured by the percentage of viable bacteria). Survival was significantly higher in the group fed 2{\%} glutamine (81{\%}) compared with the groups fed 1{\%} glycine (36{\%}), AIN-76A (35{\%}), and Purina Rodent Laboratory Mouse Chow 5001 (36{\%}) diets (p < .004). Conclusions: Glutamine-supplemented enteral diets may exert important benefits in preventing gut-origin sepsis after trauma.",
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