Oral transmission of human immunodeficiency virus by infected seminal fluid and milk

A novel mechanism

Samuel Baron, Joyce Poast, Carol Richardson, Derrick Nguyen, Miles Cloyd

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Salivary transmission by the 30 million human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) carriers is rare, despite kissing, aerosolization, and dental treatment. The main protective mechanism of saliva is reported to be inactivation of HIV-transmitting leukocytes by its unique hypotonicity; however, the successful oral transmission of HIV by seminal fluid and milk is unexplained. Whether seminal fluid and milk successfully transmit HIV orally by overcoming the recipient's salivary hypotonic inactivation of HIV- transmitting leukocytes was tested. Isotonic salt solution and normal donor samples of milk, colostrum, seminal fluid, and blood were studied for their ability to overcome the salivary hypotonic inactivation. All samples, in physiologic volumes, prevented the hypotonic saliva from inactivating HIV- transmitting leukocytes by providing solutes and retarding diffusion. This indicates that successful oral transmission of HIV by seminal fluid, milk, and colostrum may be due to their isotonicity, which overcomes hypotonic salivary inactivation of HIV-transmitting leukocytes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)498-504
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume181
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2000

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Milk
HIV
Leukocytes
Colostrum
Saliva
Isotonic Solutions
Tooth
Salts

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Immunology

Cite this

Oral transmission of human immunodeficiency virus by infected seminal fluid and milk : A novel mechanism. / Baron, Samuel; Poast, Joyce; Richardson, Carol; Nguyen, Derrick; Cloyd, Miles.

In: Journal of Infectious Diseases, Vol. 181, No. 2, 2000, p. 498-504.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Baron, Samuel ; Poast, Joyce ; Richardson, Carol ; Nguyen, Derrick ; Cloyd, Miles. / Oral transmission of human immunodeficiency virus by infected seminal fluid and milk : A novel mechanism. In: Journal of Infectious Diseases. 2000 ; Vol. 181, No. 2. pp. 498-504.
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