Osteoporosis in men

Shobha S. Rao, Nitin Budhwar, Ambreen Ashfaque

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Osteoporosis is an important and often overlooked problem in men. Although the lifetime risk of hip fracture is lower in men than in women, men are twice as likely to die after a hip fracture. Bone mineral density measurement with a T-score of -2.5 or less indicates osteoporosis. The American College of Physicians recommends beginning periodic osteoporosis risk assessment in men before 65 years of age and performing dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry for men at increased risk of osteoporosis who are candidates for drug therapy. All men diagnosed with osteoporosis should be evaluated for secondary causes of bone loss. The decision regarding treatment of osteoporosis should be based on clinical evaluation, diagnostic workup, fracture risk assessments, and bone mineral density measurements. Pharmacotherapy is recommended for men with osteoporosis and for high-risk men with low bone mass (osteopenia) with a T-score of -1 to -2.5. Bisphosphonates are the first-line agents for treating osteoporosis in men. Teriparatide (i.e., recombinant human parathyroid hormone) is an option for men with severe osteoporosis. Testosterone therapy is beneficial for men with osteoporosis and hypogonadism. Adequate intake of calcium and vitamin D should be encouraged in all men to maintain bone mass. Men should be educated regarding lifestyle measures, which include weight-bearing exercise, limiting alcohol consumption, and smoking cessation. Fall prevention strategies should be implemented in older men at risk of falls.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)503-508
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Family Physician
Volume82
Issue number5
StatePublished - Sep 1 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Osteoporosis
Hip Fractures
Bone and Bones
Bone Density
Teriparatide
Drug Therapy
Hypogonadism
Metabolic Bone Diseases
Diphosphonates
Weight-Bearing
Smoking Cessation
Vitamin D
Alcohol Drinking
Testosterone
Life Style
X-Rays
Exercise
Calcium
Physicians

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Family Practice

Cite this

Rao, S. S., Budhwar, N., & Ashfaque, A. (2010). Osteoporosis in men. American Family Physician, 82(5), 503-508.

Osteoporosis in men. / Rao, Shobha S.; Budhwar, Nitin; Ashfaque, Ambreen.

In: American Family Physician, Vol. 82, No. 5, 01.09.2010, p. 503-508.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rao, SS, Budhwar, N & Ashfaque, A 2010, 'Osteoporosis in men', American Family Physician, vol. 82, no. 5, pp. 503-508.
Rao SS, Budhwar N, Ashfaque A. Osteoporosis in men. American Family Physician. 2010 Sep 1;82(5):503-508.
Rao, Shobha S. ; Budhwar, Nitin ; Ashfaque, Ambreen. / Osteoporosis in men. In: American Family Physician. 2010 ; Vol. 82, No. 5. pp. 503-508.
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