Overuse of screening colonoscopy in the medicare population

James Goodwin, Amanpal Singh, Nischita Reddy, Taylor S. Riall, Yong Fang Kuo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

134 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: All relevant authorities recommend an interval of 10 years between normal screening colonoscopies. We assessed the timing of repeated colonoscopies after a negative screening colonoscopy finding in a population- based sample of Medicare patients. Methods: A 5% national sample of Medicare enrollees from 2000 through 2008 was used to identify averagerisk patients undergoing screening colonoscopy between 2001 and 2003. Colonoscopy was classified as a negative screening examination finding if no indication other than screening were in the claims and if no biopsy, fulguration, or polypectomy was performed. Time to repeated colonoscopy was calculated. Results: Among 24 071 Medicare patients who had a negative screening colonoscopy finding in 2001 through 2003, 46.2% underwent a repeated examination in fewer than 7 years. In 42.5% of these patients (23.5% of the overall sample), there was no clear indication for the early repeated examination. In patients aged 75 to 79 years or 80 years or older at the time of the initial negative screening colonoscopy result, 45.6% and 32.9%, respectively, received a repeated examination within 7 years. In multivariable analyses, male sex, more comorbidities, and colonoscopy by a high-volume colonoscopist or in an office setting were associated with higher rates of early repeated colonoscopy without clear indication, while those 80 years or older had a reduced risk. There were also marked geographic variations, from less than 5% in some health referral regions to greater than 50% in others. Conclusions: A large proportion of Medicare patients who undergo screening colonoscopy do so more frequently than recommended. Current Medicare regulations intending to limit reimbursement for screening colonoscopy to every 10 years would not appear to be effective.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1335-1343
Number of pages9
JournalArchives of Internal Medicine
Volume171
Issue number15
DOIs
StatePublished - 2011

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Colonoscopy
Medicare
Population
Comorbidity
Referral and Consultation
Biopsy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

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Overuse of screening colonoscopy in the medicare population. / Goodwin, James; Singh, Amanpal; Reddy, Nischita; Riall, Taylor S.; Kuo, Yong Fang.

In: Archives of Internal Medicine, Vol. 171, No. 15, 2011, p. 1335-1343.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Goodwin, James ; Singh, Amanpal ; Reddy, Nischita ; Riall, Taylor S. ; Kuo, Yong Fang. / Overuse of screening colonoscopy in the medicare population. In: Archives of Internal Medicine. 2011 ; Vol. 171, No. 15. pp. 1335-1343.
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abstract = "Background: All relevant authorities recommend an interval of 10 years between normal screening colonoscopies. We assessed the timing of repeated colonoscopies after a negative screening colonoscopy finding in a population- based sample of Medicare patients. Methods: A 5{\%} national sample of Medicare enrollees from 2000 through 2008 was used to identify averagerisk patients undergoing screening colonoscopy between 2001 and 2003. Colonoscopy was classified as a negative screening examination finding if no indication other than screening were in the claims and if no biopsy, fulguration, or polypectomy was performed. Time to repeated colonoscopy was calculated. Results: Among 24 071 Medicare patients who had a negative screening colonoscopy finding in 2001 through 2003, 46.2{\%} underwent a repeated examination in fewer than 7 years. In 42.5{\%} of these patients (23.5{\%} of the overall sample), there was no clear indication for the early repeated examination. In patients aged 75 to 79 years or 80 years or older at the time of the initial negative screening colonoscopy result, 45.6{\%} and 32.9{\%}, respectively, received a repeated examination within 7 years. In multivariable analyses, male sex, more comorbidities, and colonoscopy by a high-volume colonoscopist or in an office setting were associated with higher rates of early repeated colonoscopy without clear indication, while those 80 years or older had a reduced risk. There were also marked geographic variations, from less than 5{\%} in some health referral regions to greater than 50{\%} in others. Conclusions: A large proportion of Medicare patients who undergo screening colonoscopy do so more frequently than recommended. Current Medicare regulations intending to limit reimbursement for screening colonoscopy to every 10 years would not appear to be effective.",
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