Overview of medical operations for a manned stratospheric balloon flight

Rebecca Blue, Jennifer Law, Sean C. Norton, Alejandro Garbino, James M. Pattarini, Matthew W. Turney, Jonathan B. Clark

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Red Bull Stratos was a commercial program designed to bring a test parachutist protected by a full-pressure suit via a stratospheric balloon with a pressurized capsule to 120,000 ft (36,576 m), from which he would freefall and subsequently parachute to the ground. On March 15, 2012, the Red Bull Stratos program successfully conducted a preliminary manned balloon test flight and parachute jump, reaching a final altitude of 71,581 ft (21,818 m). In light of the uniqueness of the operation and medical threats faced, a comprehensive medical plan was needed to ensure prompt and efficient response to any medical contingencies. This report will serve to discuss the medical plans put into place before the first manned balloon flight and the actions of the medical team during that flight. Methods: The medical operations developed for this program will be systematically evaluated, particularly specific recommendations for improvement in future high-altitude and commercial space activities. Results: A multipronged approach to medical support was developed, consisting of event planning, medical personnel, equipment, contingency-specific considerations, and communications. Discussion: Medical operations were found to be highly successful when field-tested during this stratospheric flight, and the experience allowed for refinement of medical operations for future flights. The lessons learned and practices established for this program can easily be used to tailor a plan specific to other aviation or spaceflight events.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)237-241
Number of pages5
JournalAviation Space and Environmental Medicine
Volume84
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 9 2013

Fingerprint

Gravity Suits
Aviation
Space Flight
Capsules
Equipment and Supplies

Keywords

  • Contingency response
  • High altitude
  • Medical operations
  • Parachute
  • Stratosphere

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Blue, R., Law, J., Norton, S. C., Garbino, A., Pattarini, J. M., Turney, M. W., & Clark, J. B. (2013). Overview of medical operations for a manned stratospheric balloon flight. Aviation Space and Environmental Medicine, 84(3), 237-241. https://doi.org/10.3357/ASEM.3537.2013

Overview of medical operations for a manned stratospheric balloon flight. / Blue, Rebecca; Law, Jennifer; Norton, Sean C.; Garbino, Alejandro; Pattarini, James M.; Turney, Matthew W.; Clark, Jonathan B.

In: Aviation Space and Environmental Medicine, Vol. 84, No. 3, 09.04.2013, p. 237-241.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Blue, R, Law, J, Norton, SC, Garbino, A, Pattarini, JM, Turney, MW & Clark, JB 2013, 'Overview of medical operations for a manned stratospheric balloon flight', Aviation Space and Environmental Medicine, vol. 84, no. 3, pp. 237-241. https://doi.org/10.3357/ASEM.3537.2013
Blue, Rebecca ; Law, Jennifer ; Norton, Sean C. ; Garbino, Alejandro ; Pattarini, James M. ; Turney, Matthew W. ; Clark, Jonathan B. / Overview of medical operations for a manned stratospheric balloon flight. In: Aviation Space and Environmental Medicine. 2013 ; Vol. 84, No. 3. pp. 237-241.
@article{8ea68eecc2224d548388eaa534748ff7,
title = "Overview of medical operations for a manned stratospheric balloon flight",
abstract = "Introduction: Red Bull Stratos was a commercial program designed to bring a test parachutist protected by a full-pressure suit via a stratospheric balloon with a pressurized capsule to 120,000 ft (36,576 m), from which he would freefall and subsequently parachute to the ground. On March 15, 2012, the Red Bull Stratos program successfully conducted a preliminary manned balloon test flight and parachute jump, reaching a final altitude of 71,581 ft (21,818 m). In light of the uniqueness of the operation and medical threats faced, a comprehensive medical plan was needed to ensure prompt and efficient response to any medical contingencies. This report will serve to discuss the medical plans put into place before the first manned balloon flight and the actions of the medical team during that flight. Methods: The medical operations developed for this program will be systematically evaluated, particularly specific recommendations for improvement in future high-altitude and commercial space activities. Results: A multipronged approach to medical support was developed, consisting of event planning, medical personnel, equipment, contingency-specific considerations, and communications. Discussion: Medical operations were found to be highly successful when field-tested during this stratospheric flight, and the experience allowed for refinement of medical operations for future flights. The lessons learned and practices established for this program can easily be used to tailor a plan specific to other aviation or spaceflight events.",
keywords = "Contingency response, High altitude, Medical operations, Parachute, Stratosphere",
author = "Rebecca Blue and Jennifer Law and Norton, {Sean C.} and Alejandro Garbino and Pattarini, {James M.} and Turney, {Matthew W.} and Clark, {Jonathan B.}",
year = "2013",
month = "4",
day = "9",
doi = "10.3357/ASEM.3537.2013",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "84",
pages = "237--241",
journal = "Aerospace medicine and human performance",
issn = "2375-6314",
publisher = "Aerospace Medical Association",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Overview of medical operations for a manned stratospheric balloon flight

AU - Blue, Rebecca

AU - Law, Jennifer

AU - Norton, Sean C.

AU - Garbino, Alejandro

AU - Pattarini, James M.

AU - Turney, Matthew W.

AU - Clark, Jonathan B.

PY - 2013/4/9

Y1 - 2013/4/9

N2 - Introduction: Red Bull Stratos was a commercial program designed to bring a test parachutist protected by a full-pressure suit via a stratospheric balloon with a pressurized capsule to 120,000 ft (36,576 m), from which he would freefall and subsequently parachute to the ground. On March 15, 2012, the Red Bull Stratos program successfully conducted a preliminary manned balloon test flight and parachute jump, reaching a final altitude of 71,581 ft (21,818 m). In light of the uniqueness of the operation and medical threats faced, a comprehensive medical plan was needed to ensure prompt and efficient response to any medical contingencies. This report will serve to discuss the medical plans put into place before the first manned balloon flight and the actions of the medical team during that flight. Methods: The medical operations developed for this program will be systematically evaluated, particularly specific recommendations for improvement in future high-altitude and commercial space activities. Results: A multipronged approach to medical support was developed, consisting of event planning, medical personnel, equipment, contingency-specific considerations, and communications. Discussion: Medical operations were found to be highly successful when field-tested during this stratospheric flight, and the experience allowed for refinement of medical operations for future flights. The lessons learned and practices established for this program can easily be used to tailor a plan specific to other aviation or spaceflight events.

AB - Introduction: Red Bull Stratos was a commercial program designed to bring a test parachutist protected by a full-pressure suit via a stratospheric balloon with a pressurized capsule to 120,000 ft (36,576 m), from which he would freefall and subsequently parachute to the ground. On March 15, 2012, the Red Bull Stratos program successfully conducted a preliminary manned balloon test flight and parachute jump, reaching a final altitude of 71,581 ft (21,818 m). In light of the uniqueness of the operation and medical threats faced, a comprehensive medical plan was needed to ensure prompt and efficient response to any medical contingencies. This report will serve to discuss the medical plans put into place before the first manned balloon flight and the actions of the medical team during that flight. Methods: The medical operations developed for this program will be systematically evaluated, particularly specific recommendations for improvement in future high-altitude and commercial space activities. Results: A multipronged approach to medical support was developed, consisting of event planning, medical personnel, equipment, contingency-specific considerations, and communications. Discussion: Medical operations were found to be highly successful when field-tested during this stratospheric flight, and the experience allowed for refinement of medical operations for future flights. The lessons learned and practices established for this program can easily be used to tailor a plan specific to other aviation or spaceflight events.

KW - Contingency response

KW - High altitude

KW - Medical operations

KW - Parachute

KW - Stratosphere

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84875779610&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84875779610&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3357/ASEM.3537.2013

DO - 10.3357/ASEM.3537.2013

M3 - Article

C2 - 23513285

AN - SCOPUS:84875779610

VL - 84

SP - 237

EP - 241

JO - Aerospace medicine and human performance

JF - Aerospace medicine and human performance

SN - 2375-6314

IS - 3

ER -