Oxygen resuscitation does not ameliorate neonatal hypoxia/ischemia-induced cerebral edema

Diana Carolina Ferrari, Olivera B. Nesic, J. Regino Perez-Polo

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    18 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Neonatal hypoxia/ischemia (HI) is a common cause of cognitive and behavioral deficits in children with hyperoxia treatment (HHI) being the current therapy for newborn resuscitation. HI induces cerebral edema that is associated with poor neurological outcomes. Our objective was to characterize cerebral edema after HI and determine the consequences of HHI (40% or 100% O 2). Dry weight analyses showed cerebral edema 1 to 21 days after HI in the ipsilateral cortex; and 3 to 21 days after HI in the contralateral cortex. Furthermore, HI increased blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability 1 to 7 days after HI, leading to bilateral cortical vasogenic edema. HHI failed to prevent HI-induced increase in BBB permeability and edema development. At the molecular level, HI increased ipsilateral, but not contralateral, AQP4 cortical levels at 3 and up to 21 days after HI. HHI treatment did not further affect HI-induced changes in AQP4. In addition, we observed developmental increases of AQP4 accompanied by significant reduction in water content and increase permeability of the BBB. Our results suggest that the ipsilateral HI-induced increase in AQP4 may be beneficial and that its absence in the contralateral cortex may account for edema formation after HI. Finally, we showed that HI induced impaired motor coordination 21 days after the insult and HHI did not ameliorate this behavioral outcome. We conclude that HHI treatment is effective as a resuscitating therapy, but does not ameliorate HI-induced cerebral edema and impaired motor coordination.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)2056-2065
    Number of pages10
    JournalJournal of Neuroscience Research
    Volume88
    Issue number9
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jul 2010

    Fingerprint

    Brain Edema
    Resuscitation
    Ischemia
    Oxygen
    Blood-Brain Barrier
    Permeability
    Edema
    Hypoxia
    Therapeutics
    Hyperoxia

    Keywords

    • Aquaporin 4
    • Hyperoxia
    • Vasogenic edema

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

    Cite this

    Oxygen resuscitation does not ameliorate neonatal hypoxia/ischemia-induced cerebral edema. / Ferrari, Diana Carolina; Nesic, Olivera B.; Perez-Polo, J. Regino.

    In: Journal of Neuroscience Research, Vol. 88, No. 9, 07.2010, p. 2056-2065.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Ferrari, Diana Carolina ; Nesic, Olivera B. ; Perez-Polo, J. Regino. / Oxygen resuscitation does not ameliorate neonatal hypoxia/ischemia-induced cerebral edema. In: Journal of Neuroscience Research. 2010 ; Vol. 88, No. 9. pp. 2056-2065.
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