Pancreastatin: Characterization of biological activity

Tao Zhang, Tohru Mochizuki, Masafumi Kogire, Jin Ishizuka, Noboru Yanaihara, James C. Thompson, George H. Greeley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Pancreastatin (PST) (1-49) was first isolated from the porcine pancreas and can inhibit glucose-induced insulin release. PST (33-49), a PST C-terminal fragment, can also inhibit insulin release. The purpose of this study was to determine the shortest C-terminal biologically active fragment of PST, in terms of inhibition of insulin release from the isolated perfused rat pancreas. Porcine PST (1-49) and C-terminal fragments, PST (33-49), PST (35-49), PST (37-49) and PST (39-49) were synthesized by solid-phase methodology. PST (1-49), PST (33-49) and PST (35-49), at 10 nM, significantly (p <0.05) inhibited insulin release from isolated perfused rat pancreas: the first phase was inhibited by 15.6±2.4, 24.4±6.5 and 12.5±1.9% and the second phase, 18.9±2.7, 25.7±4.8 and 20.1±1.9% by PST (1-49), PST (33-49) and PST (35-49), respectively. PST (35-49) shows a dose-dependent inhibition of insulin release. PST (37-49) and PST (39-49) were, however, inactive. Our results indicate that the shortest C-terminal biologically active fragment is PST (35-49). These data further indicate that the C-terminal portion of PST is primarily responsible for the biological activity of PST.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1157-1160
Number of pages4
JournalBiochemical and Biophysical Research Communications
Volume173
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 31 1990

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Bioactivity
Insulin
Pancreas
pancreastatin
Rats
Swine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Biophysics
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Zhang, T., Mochizuki, T., Kogire, M., Ishizuka, J., Yanaihara, N., Thompson, J. C., & Greeley, G. H. (1990). Pancreastatin: Characterization of biological activity. Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, 173(3), 1157-1160. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0006-291X(05)80907-6

Pancreastatin : Characterization of biological activity. / Zhang, Tao; Mochizuki, Tohru; Kogire, Masafumi; Ishizuka, Jin; Yanaihara, Noboru; Thompson, James C.; Greeley, George H.

In: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, Vol. 173, No. 3, 31.12.1990, p. 1157-1160.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zhang, T, Mochizuki, T, Kogire, M, Ishizuka, J, Yanaihara, N, Thompson, JC & Greeley, GH 1990, 'Pancreastatin: Characterization of biological activity', Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, vol. 173, no. 3, pp. 1157-1160. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0006-291X(05)80907-6
Zhang T, Mochizuki T, Kogire M, Ishizuka J, Yanaihara N, Thompson JC et al. Pancreastatin: Characterization of biological activity. Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications. 1990 Dec 31;173(3):1157-1160. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0006-291X(05)80907-6
Zhang, Tao ; Mochizuki, Tohru ; Kogire, Masafumi ; Ishizuka, Jin ; Yanaihara, Noboru ; Thompson, James C. ; Greeley, George H. / Pancreastatin : Characterization of biological activity. In: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications. 1990 ; Vol. 173, No. 3. pp. 1157-1160.
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