Pathologic and virologic study of fatal Lassa fever in man

David Walker, J. B. McCormick, K. M. Johnson, P. A. Webb, G. Komba-Kono, L. H. Elliott, J. J. Gardner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

129 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Postmortem examination of 21 virologically documented cases of Lassa fever, including 6 complete autopsies, was performed as part of a field study of community-acquired Lassa fever in Sierra Leone. The most consistently observed lesions were hepatocellular, adrenal, and splenic necrosis and adrenal cytoplasmic inclusions. Neither these lesions, nor other milder and less constantly observed lesions such as myocarditis, renal tubular injury, and interstitial pneumonia, appeared severe enough to explain the cause of death in Lassa fever. The central nervous system (CNS) contained no specific lesions. Viral titrations demonstrated high viral content in liver, lung, spleen, kidney, heart, placenta, and mammary gland. Clinical laboratory data included elevation of hepatic enzymes, creatine phosphokinase (CPK), and blood urea nitrogen (BUN). Because of the paucity of pathologic lesions in spite of widely disseminated viral infection, further investigation of humoral inflammatory mechanisms is indicated.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)349-356
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Pathology
Volume107
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1982
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Lassa Fever
Autopsy
Sierra Leone
Kidney
Liver
Blood Urea Nitrogen
Inclusion Bodies
Interstitial Lung Diseases
Myocarditis
Virus Diseases
Human Mammary Glands
Creatine Kinase
Placenta
Cause of Death
Necrosis
Spleen
Central Nervous System
Lung
Wounds and Injuries
Enzymes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

Cite this

Walker, D., McCormick, J. B., Johnson, K. M., Webb, P. A., Komba-Kono, G., Elliott, L. H., & Gardner, J. J. (1982). Pathologic and virologic study of fatal Lassa fever in man. American Journal of Pathology, 107(3), 349-356.

Pathologic and virologic study of fatal Lassa fever in man. / Walker, David; McCormick, J. B.; Johnson, K. M.; Webb, P. A.; Komba-Kono, G.; Elliott, L. H.; Gardner, J. J.

In: American Journal of Pathology, Vol. 107, No. 3, 1982, p. 349-356.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Walker, D, McCormick, JB, Johnson, KM, Webb, PA, Komba-Kono, G, Elliott, LH & Gardner, JJ 1982, 'Pathologic and virologic study of fatal Lassa fever in man', American Journal of Pathology, vol. 107, no. 3, pp. 349-356.
Walker D, McCormick JB, Johnson KM, Webb PA, Komba-Kono G, Elliott LH et al. Pathologic and virologic study of fatal Lassa fever in man. American Journal of Pathology. 1982;107(3):349-356.
Walker, David ; McCormick, J. B. ; Johnson, K. M. ; Webb, P. A. ; Komba-Kono, G. ; Elliott, L. H. ; Gardner, J. J. / Pathologic and virologic study of fatal Lassa fever in man. In: American Journal of Pathology. 1982 ; Vol. 107, No. 3. pp. 349-356.
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