Patient impressions of possible catastrophic outcomes after diabetic foot ulceration

Zachary Ashmore, Benjamin Vickers, Javier La Fontaine, Naohiro Shibuya, Daniel Jupiter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Diabetes Mellitus (DM) and its complications are well studied; patients with diabetes may suffer from neuropathy and vascular issues, and associated with these, lower extremity ulceration. Ulcers are often refractory to treatment, and can be difficult for both patients and clinicians to manage. Such complications may lead to amputations, which in turn are a risk factor for death. However, in certain situations amputation may be the only option available, and may be used as reconstructive surgery, restoring function. The impacts of ulceration, amputation, use of prostheses, and other complications of diabetes on Quality of Life (QOL) are well studied. Similarly, the impact of QOL on overall health has been studied in some detail. Objective: Not as well understood are patient expectations regarding amputation and ulceration, and patient knowledge of these outcomes. Specifically, it is not fully understood how patients view these complications prior to their occurrence. In this review we survey the literature for studies discussing these attitudes. Our objective was to perform a systematic review of the medical literature to understand how patients understand and anticipate the potential negative outcomes of ulceration and amputation. We also aimed to identify areas where there are gaps in patient knowledge, which could be addressed by clinicians. Results: Our study yielded articles regarding impressions of patients with diabetes about their general health and outcomes. However, we did not discover much literature directly concerning attitudes toward catastrophic lower extremity outcomes before they occurred. We also identified that patients lack knowledge of management and complications of diabetes; both of these gaps provide an opportunity to better direct care for such patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)376-388
Number of pages13
JournalCurrent Diabetes Reviews
Volume14
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

Diabetic Foot
Amputation
Diabetes Complications
Lower Extremity
Reconstructive Surgical Procedures
Quality of Life
Knowledge Management
Health
Ulcer
Prostheses and Implants
Blood Vessels
Patient Care

Keywords

  • Amputation
  • Diabetic foot ulceration
  • Fatalism
  • Mortality
  • Patient attitudes
  • Patient knowledge
  • Quality of life

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology

Cite this

Patient impressions of possible catastrophic outcomes after diabetic foot ulceration. / Ashmore, Zachary; Vickers, Benjamin; La Fontaine, Javier; Shibuya, Naohiro; Jupiter, Daniel.

In: Current Diabetes Reviews, Vol. 14, No. 4, 01.01.2018, p. 376-388.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ashmore, Zachary ; Vickers, Benjamin ; La Fontaine, Javier ; Shibuya, Naohiro ; Jupiter, Daniel. / Patient impressions of possible catastrophic outcomes after diabetic foot ulceration. In: Current Diabetes Reviews. 2018 ; Vol. 14, No. 4. pp. 376-388.
@article{391ca3b0a9f04c5eb856ee8352c21780,
title = "Patient impressions of possible catastrophic outcomes after diabetic foot ulceration",
abstract = "Background: Diabetes Mellitus (DM) and its complications are well studied; patients with diabetes may suffer from neuropathy and vascular issues, and associated with these, lower extremity ulceration. Ulcers are often refractory to treatment, and can be difficult for both patients and clinicians to manage. Such complications may lead to amputations, which in turn are a risk factor for death. However, in certain situations amputation may be the only option available, and may be used as reconstructive surgery, restoring function. The impacts of ulceration, amputation, use of prostheses, and other complications of diabetes on Quality of Life (QOL) are well studied. Similarly, the impact of QOL on overall health has been studied in some detail. Objective: Not as well understood are patient expectations regarding amputation and ulceration, and patient knowledge of these outcomes. Specifically, it is not fully understood how patients view these complications prior to their occurrence. In this review we survey the literature for studies discussing these attitudes. Our objective was to perform a systematic review of the medical literature to understand how patients understand and anticipate the potential negative outcomes of ulceration and amputation. We also aimed to identify areas where there are gaps in patient knowledge, which could be addressed by clinicians. Results: Our study yielded articles regarding impressions of patients with diabetes about their general health and outcomes. However, we did not discover much literature directly concerning attitudes toward catastrophic lower extremity outcomes before they occurred. We also identified that patients lack knowledge of management and complications of diabetes; both of these gaps provide an opportunity to better direct care for such patients.",
keywords = "Amputation, Diabetic foot ulceration, Fatalism, Mortality, Patient attitudes, Patient knowledge, Quality of life",
author = "Zachary Ashmore and Benjamin Vickers and {La Fontaine}, Javier and Naohiro Shibuya and Daniel Jupiter",
year = "2018",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.2174/1573399813666170612103814",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "14",
pages = "376--388",
journal = "Current Diabetes Reviews",
issn = "1573-3998",
publisher = "Bentham Science Publishers B.V.",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Patient impressions of possible catastrophic outcomes after diabetic foot ulceration

AU - Ashmore, Zachary

AU - Vickers, Benjamin

AU - La Fontaine, Javier

AU - Shibuya, Naohiro

AU - Jupiter, Daniel

PY - 2018/1/1

Y1 - 2018/1/1

N2 - Background: Diabetes Mellitus (DM) and its complications are well studied; patients with diabetes may suffer from neuropathy and vascular issues, and associated with these, lower extremity ulceration. Ulcers are often refractory to treatment, and can be difficult for both patients and clinicians to manage. Such complications may lead to amputations, which in turn are a risk factor for death. However, in certain situations amputation may be the only option available, and may be used as reconstructive surgery, restoring function. The impacts of ulceration, amputation, use of prostheses, and other complications of diabetes on Quality of Life (QOL) are well studied. Similarly, the impact of QOL on overall health has been studied in some detail. Objective: Not as well understood are patient expectations regarding amputation and ulceration, and patient knowledge of these outcomes. Specifically, it is not fully understood how patients view these complications prior to their occurrence. In this review we survey the literature for studies discussing these attitudes. Our objective was to perform a systematic review of the medical literature to understand how patients understand and anticipate the potential negative outcomes of ulceration and amputation. We also aimed to identify areas where there are gaps in patient knowledge, which could be addressed by clinicians. Results: Our study yielded articles regarding impressions of patients with diabetes about their general health and outcomes. However, we did not discover much literature directly concerning attitudes toward catastrophic lower extremity outcomes before they occurred. We also identified that patients lack knowledge of management and complications of diabetes; both of these gaps provide an opportunity to better direct care for such patients.

AB - Background: Diabetes Mellitus (DM) and its complications are well studied; patients with diabetes may suffer from neuropathy and vascular issues, and associated with these, lower extremity ulceration. Ulcers are often refractory to treatment, and can be difficult for both patients and clinicians to manage. Such complications may lead to amputations, which in turn are a risk factor for death. However, in certain situations amputation may be the only option available, and may be used as reconstructive surgery, restoring function. The impacts of ulceration, amputation, use of prostheses, and other complications of diabetes on Quality of Life (QOL) are well studied. Similarly, the impact of QOL on overall health has been studied in some detail. Objective: Not as well understood are patient expectations regarding amputation and ulceration, and patient knowledge of these outcomes. Specifically, it is not fully understood how patients view these complications prior to their occurrence. In this review we survey the literature for studies discussing these attitudes. Our objective was to perform a systematic review of the medical literature to understand how patients understand and anticipate the potential negative outcomes of ulceration and amputation. We also aimed to identify areas where there are gaps in patient knowledge, which could be addressed by clinicians. Results: Our study yielded articles regarding impressions of patients with diabetes about their general health and outcomes. However, we did not discover much literature directly concerning attitudes toward catastrophic lower extremity outcomes before they occurred. We also identified that patients lack knowledge of management and complications of diabetes; both of these gaps provide an opportunity to better direct care for such patients.

KW - Amputation

KW - Diabetic foot ulceration

KW - Fatalism

KW - Mortality

KW - Patient attitudes

KW - Patient knowledge

KW - Quality of life

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85042612938&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85042612938&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.2174/1573399813666170612103814

DO - 10.2174/1573399813666170612103814

M3 - Article

VL - 14

SP - 376

EP - 388

JO - Current Diabetes Reviews

JF - Current Diabetes Reviews

SN - 1573-3998

IS - 4

ER -