Patient personal injury litigation against dermatology residency programs in the United States, 1964-1988. Implications for future risk-management programs in dermatology and dermatologic surgery

E. S. Hollabaugh, Richard Wagner, V. W. Weedn, E. B. Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A national survey reviewing patient injury litigation against US dermatology residency programs revealed that 50% of the respondents had experienced at least one lawsuit between 1964 and 1988. The northeast region reported the most legal activity. Fifty percent of the lawsuits related to therapeutic or surgical complications. Plaintiffs were successful in 37.9% of the lawsuits. The mean award was $26 505, and the largest reported award of $200 000 was for failing to diagnose herpes simplex in an immunocompromised patient. In view of several recent trends in dermatology, the amount of litigation against dermatologists may increase.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)618-622
Number of pages5
JournalArchives of Dermatology
Volume126
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 1990

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Dermatologic Surgical Procedures
Risk Management
Jurisprudence
Internship and Residency
Dermatology
Herpes Simplex
Wounds and Injuries
Immunocompromised Host
Surveys and Questionnaires
Therapeutics
Dermatologists

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology

Cite this

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