Patterns of self-monitoring technology use and weight loss in people with overweight or obesity

Michael C. Robertson, Margaret Raber, Yue Liao, Ivan Wu, Nathan Parker, Leticia Gatus, Thuan Le, Casey P. Durand, Karen M. Basen-Engquist

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Mobile applications and paired devices allow individuals to self-monitor physical activity, dietary intake, and weight fluctuation concurrently. However, little is known regarding patterns of use of these self-monitoring technologies over time and their implications for weight loss. The objectives of this study were to identify distinct patterns of self-monitoring technology use and to investigate the associations between these patterns and weight change. We analyzed data from a 6-month weight loss intervention for school district employees with overweight or obesity (N = 225). We performed repeated measures latent profile analysis (RMLPA) to identify common patterns of self-monitoring technology use and used multiple linear regression to evaluate the relationship between self-monitoring technology use and weight change. RMLPA revealed four distinct profiles: minimal users (n = 65, 29% of sample), activity trackers (n = 124, 55%), dedicated all-Around users (n = 25, 11%), and dedicated all-Around users with exceptional food logging (n = 11, 5%). The dedicated all-Around users with exceptional food logging lost the most weight (X2[1,225] = 5.27, p =. 0217). Multiple linear regression revealed that, adjusting for covariates, only percentage of days of wireless weight scale use (B =-0.05, t(212) =-3.79, p <. 001) was independently associated with weight loss. We identified distinct patterns in mHealth self-monitoring technology use for tracking weight loss behaviors. Self-monitoring of weight was most consistently linked to weight loss, while exceptional food logging characterized the group with the greatest weight loss. Weight loss interventions should promote self-monitoring of weight and consider encouraging food logging to individuals who have demonstrated consistent use of self-monitoring technologies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1537-1547
Number of pages11
JournalTranslational Behavioral Medicine
Volume11
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2021
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Diet
  • Feedback
  • Physical activity
  • Weight loss
  • mHealth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Patterns of self-monitoring technology use and weight loss in people with overweight or obesity'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this