Perceived health change in the aftermath of a petrochemical accident: An examination of pre-accident, within-accident, and post-accident variables

Mary Peek, M. P. Cutchin, D. H. Freeman, Norma Perez, James Goodwin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Little research has been conducted on changes in perceived health after an industrial accident. Using data from an ongoing survey on stress and health in a petrochemical complex in Texas City, Texas, the associations of a petrochemical accident with perceived health changes were examined. Methods: The mean changes in perceived mental and physical health across pre-accident, within-accident, and post-accident categories were compared. The association of these categorical variables with the change in perceived mental and physical health using multiple regression was also examined. Results: Significant declines in both perceived mental and physical health were observed for the sample. Regression analyses showed that middle age, lower education level and reported damage in the neighbourhood were associated with decreases in perceived mental health. Lower education level, explosion impact, and distance from the explosion site were associated with decreases in perceived physical health. Conclusions: These results indicate that both pre-accident and within-accident variables, such as education level and explosion impact, are associated with decreases in perceived physical and mental health. Even a modest event within the range of accidents and disasters was shown to be associated with negative health outcomes for a population-based sample.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)106-112
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Epidemiology and Community Health
Volume62
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2008

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Accidents
Mental Health
Health
Explosions
Education
Occupational Accidents
Disasters
Regression Analysis
Research
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

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title = "Perceived health change in the aftermath of a petrochemical accident: An examination of pre-accident, within-accident, and post-accident variables",
abstract = "Background: Little research has been conducted on changes in perceived health after an industrial accident. Using data from an ongoing survey on stress and health in a petrochemical complex in Texas City, Texas, the associations of a petrochemical accident with perceived health changes were examined. Methods: The mean changes in perceived mental and physical health across pre-accident, within-accident, and post-accident categories were compared. The association of these categorical variables with the change in perceived mental and physical health using multiple regression was also examined. Results: Significant declines in both perceived mental and physical health were observed for the sample. Regression analyses showed that middle age, lower education level and reported damage in the neighbourhood were associated with decreases in perceived mental health. Lower education level, explosion impact, and distance from the explosion site were associated with decreases in perceived physical health. Conclusions: These results indicate that both pre-accident and within-accident variables, such as education level and explosion impact, are associated with decreases in perceived physical and mental health. Even a modest event within the range of accidents and disasters was shown to be associated with negative health outcomes for a population-based sample.",
author = "Mary Peek and Cutchin, {M. P.} and Freeman, {D. H.} and Norma Perez and James Goodwin",
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AU - Freeman, D. H.

AU - Perez, Norma

AU - Goodwin, James

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N2 - Background: Little research has been conducted on changes in perceived health after an industrial accident. Using data from an ongoing survey on stress and health in a petrochemical complex in Texas City, Texas, the associations of a petrochemical accident with perceived health changes were examined. Methods: The mean changes in perceived mental and physical health across pre-accident, within-accident, and post-accident categories were compared. The association of these categorical variables with the change in perceived mental and physical health using multiple regression was also examined. Results: Significant declines in both perceived mental and physical health were observed for the sample. Regression analyses showed that middle age, lower education level and reported damage in the neighbourhood were associated with decreases in perceived mental health. Lower education level, explosion impact, and distance from the explosion site were associated with decreases in perceived physical health. Conclusions: These results indicate that both pre-accident and within-accident variables, such as education level and explosion impact, are associated with decreases in perceived physical and mental health. Even a modest event within the range of accidents and disasters was shown to be associated with negative health outcomes for a population-based sample.

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