Performance of the interpersonal needs questionnaire in adolescent clinical samples: Confirmatory factor analyses and evaluation of measurement invariance

Ryan M. Hill, William Mellick, Lauren Alvis, Cody G. Dodd, Calvin Do, Victor Buitron, Carla Sharp, Jeremy W. Pettit, Julie B. Kaplow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: This study evaluated the factor structure, internal consistency reliability, construct and criterion validity, and measurement invariance of the Interpersonal Needs Questionnaire (INQ) among adolescents. Method: Participants (N = 539) included three distinct samples of youth drawn from two outpatient psychology clinics and an inpatient psychiatric unit. The combined sample was 63.3% female and had a mean age of 14.95 years (SD = 1.31 years). All participants completed the INQ as well as measures of depressive symptoms and suicide ideation. Results: Confirmatory factor analyses indicated that the removal of three items from the thwarted belongingness subscale of the INQ was needed to achieve acceptable model fit. The resulting combined 12-item scale demonstrated good factor structure, internal consistency reliability, construct validity, and criterion validity. The modified 12-item INQ also demonstrated scalar invariance across subgroups defined by sex, race, and age. Conclusions: Findings support the use of this reduced 12-item version of the INQ among adolescents. Youth may have difficulty accurately responding to changes in item valence; thus, future research with youth should consider using a 12-item version of the INQ that avoids valence changes within subscales.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1214-1222
Number of pages9
JournalSuicide and Life-Threatening Behavior
Volume50
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Performance of the interpersonal needs questionnaire in adolescent clinical samples: Confirmatory factor analyses and evaluation of measurement invariance'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this