Perfusion in hamster skin treated with glycerol

Raiyan T. Zaman, Ashwin B. Parthasarathy, Gracie Vargas, Bo Chen, Andrew K. Dunn, Henry G. Rylander, Ashley J. Welch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and Objective: The objective of this article is to quantify the effect of hyper-osmotic agent (glycerol) on blood velocity in hamster skin blood vessels measured with a dynamic imaging technique, laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI). Study Design/Materials and Methods: In this study a dorsal skin-flap window was implanted on the hamster skin. The hyper-osmotic drug, that is, glycerol was delivered to the skin through the open dermal end of the window model. A two-dimensional map of blood flow of skin blood vessels was obtained from the speckle contrast (SC) images. Results: Preliminary studies demonstrated that hyperosmotic agents such as glycerol not only make tissue temporarily transparent, but also reduce blood flow. The blood perfusion was measured every 3 minutes for 36-66 minutes after diffusion of anhydrous glycerol. Blood flow in small capillaries was found to be reduced significantly within 3-9 minutes. Blood flow in larger blood vessels (i.e., all arteries and veins) decreased over time and some veins had significantly reduced blood flow within 36 minutes. At 24 hours, there was a further reduction in capillary blood perfusion whereas larger blood vessels regained flow compared to an hour after initial application of glycerol. Conclusion: Blood flow velocity and vessel diameter of the micro-vasculatures of hamster skin were reduced by the application of 100% anhydrous glycerol. At 24 hours, capillary perfusion remained depressed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)492-503
Number of pages12
JournalLasers in Surgery and Medicine
Volume41
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2009

Fingerprint

Cricetinae
Glycerol
Perfusion
Skin
Blood Vessels
Veins
Blood Flow Velocity
Lasers
Arteries
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Keywords

  • Blood flow velocity
  • Hyper-osmotic agents
  • Laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI)
  • Speckle contrast (SC)
  • Speckle measurement
  • Window model

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Dermatology

Cite this

Zaman, R. T., Parthasarathy, A. B., Vargas, G., Chen, B., Dunn, A. K., Rylander, H. G., & Welch, A. J. (2009). Perfusion in hamster skin treated with glycerol. Lasers in Surgery and Medicine, 41(7), 492-503. https://doi.org/10.1002/lsm.20803

Perfusion in hamster skin treated with glycerol. / Zaman, Raiyan T.; Parthasarathy, Ashwin B.; Vargas, Gracie; Chen, Bo; Dunn, Andrew K.; Rylander, Henry G.; Welch, Ashley J.

In: Lasers in Surgery and Medicine, Vol. 41, No. 7, 09.2009, p. 492-503.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zaman, RT, Parthasarathy, AB, Vargas, G, Chen, B, Dunn, AK, Rylander, HG & Welch, AJ 2009, 'Perfusion in hamster skin treated with glycerol', Lasers in Surgery and Medicine, vol. 41, no. 7, pp. 492-503. https://doi.org/10.1002/lsm.20803
Zaman RT, Parthasarathy AB, Vargas G, Chen B, Dunn AK, Rylander HG et al. Perfusion in hamster skin treated with glycerol. Lasers in Surgery and Medicine. 2009 Sep;41(7):492-503. https://doi.org/10.1002/lsm.20803
Zaman, Raiyan T. ; Parthasarathy, Ashwin B. ; Vargas, Gracie ; Chen, Bo ; Dunn, Andrew K. ; Rylander, Henry G. ; Welch, Ashley J. / Perfusion in hamster skin treated with glycerol. In: Lasers in Surgery and Medicine. 2009 ; Vol. 41, No. 7. pp. 492-503.
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