Phenylephrine does not reduce cerebral perfusion during canine cardiopulmonary bypass

W. E. Johnston, Douglas Dewitt, J. Vinten-Johansen, D. A. Stump, Donald Prough

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Gaseous microemboli during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) could injure the blood-brain barrier so that cerebral vasoconstriction would result from infusing α-agonist drugs, such as phenylephrine. Cerebral blood flow (radioactive microspheres) and metabolism were measured in seven dogs after rewarming from 150 min hypothermic CPB with bubble oxygenators used to produce gaseous microemboli. Phenylephrine (40 μg/min) was infused directly into the brachiocephalic artery so that aortic pressure before (80 ± 2 mm Hg) and during (79 ± 3 mm Hg) the infusion did not change. Neither blood flow to the cerebral hemispheres (P = 0.960), cerebellum (P = 0.854), and brainstem (P = 0.694) nor the cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen (P = 0.862) differed when values obtained before and after 30 min of phenylephrine infusion were compared. Cerebral vascular resistance was also unchanged by phenylephrine, being 1.22 ± 0.10 mm Hg · mL-1 · min-1 · 100 g-1 before infusion and 1.25 ± 0.17 mm Hg · mL-1 · min-1 · 100 g-1 during infusion (P = 0.849). Phenylephrine does not cause cerebral vasoconstriction after rewarming from hypothermic CPB, a finding which suggests that the blood-brain barrier is preserved during bypass.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)14-18
Number of pages5
JournalAnesthesia and Analgesia
Volume79
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1994

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Phenylephrine
Cardiopulmonary Bypass
Canidae
Perfusion
Rewarming
Vasoconstriction
Blood-Brain Barrier
Cerebrovascular Circulation
Oxygenators
Cerebrum
Microspheres
Vascular Resistance
Cerebellum
Brain Stem
Arterial Pressure
Arteries
Dogs
Oxygen
Pharmaceutical Preparations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

Phenylephrine does not reduce cerebral perfusion during canine cardiopulmonary bypass. / Johnston, W. E.; Dewitt, Douglas; Vinten-Johansen, J.; Stump, D. A.; Prough, Donald.

In: Anesthesia and Analgesia, Vol. 79, No. 1, 1994, p. 14-18.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Johnston, W. E. ; Dewitt, Douglas ; Vinten-Johansen, J. ; Stump, D. A. ; Prough, Donald. / Phenylephrine does not reduce cerebral perfusion during canine cardiopulmonary bypass. In: Anesthesia and Analgesia. 1994 ; Vol. 79, No. 1. pp. 14-18.
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