Physical and psychosocial consequences of stroke in elderly Mexican Americans

Jacquelyne Ontiveros, Todd Q. Miller, Kyriakos Markides, David V. Espino

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The current study examines the psychosocial and physical predictors and consequences of stroke among elderly non-institutionalized Mexican Americans. . Design: A cross-sectional cohort study design was used. Setting: The sampling frame included the Southwestern United States (Arizona, California, Colorado, New Mexico and Texas) where subjects were interviewed in their homes. Participants: A probability sample consisted of 3,050 Mexican Americans aged 65 or older. Main outcome measure: The main outcome measure was self-report of being diagnosed by a physician as having a stroke that required hospitalization. Results: Those who ever had a stroke (N= 159) were less likely to be able to perform activities of daily living than persons who never had a stroke (N=2,869). Rates of disability and prevalence of stroke appear to be higher in elderly Mexican Americans than in the general elderly population. Greater education and language acculturation were risk factors for having a stroke. Conclusions: The finding that Mexican Americans who are less acculturated are more healthy suggests that acculturation may increase morbidity and, potentially, mortality from stroke.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)212-217
Number of pages6
JournalEthnicity and Disease
Volume9
Issue number2
StatePublished - Mar 1999

Fingerprint

Stroke
Acculturation
Southwestern United States
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Sampling Studies
Activities of Daily Living
Self Report
Hospitalization
Cohort Studies
Language
Cross-Sectional Studies
Morbidity
Physicians
Education
Mortality
Population

Keywords

  • Disability
  • Elderly
  • Mexican Americans
  • Stroke

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Physical and psychosocial consequences of stroke in elderly Mexican Americans. / Ontiveros, Jacquelyne; Miller, Todd Q.; Markides, Kyriakos; Espino, David V.

In: Ethnicity and Disease, Vol. 9, No. 2, 03.1999, p. 212-217.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ontiveros, J, Miller, TQ, Markides, K & Espino, DV 1999, 'Physical and psychosocial consequences of stroke in elderly Mexican Americans', Ethnicity and Disease, vol. 9, no. 2, pp. 212-217.
Ontiveros, Jacquelyne ; Miller, Todd Q. ; Markides, Kyriakos ; Espino, David V. / Physical and psychosocial consequences of stroke in elderly Mexican Americans. In: Ethnicity and Disease. 1999 ; Vol. 9, No. 2. pp. 212-217.
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